4.3 Parliamentary Zone Precinct Code

4.3.1 Precinct location

The Parliamentary Zone Precinct consists of the Parliamentary Zone, being the eastern side of the Commonwealth Avenue road reserve between State Circle and the southern shore of the Lake, Capital Hill, and the western side of the Kings Avenue road reserve between State Circle and the southern shore of the Lake.

The Parliamentary Zone is the area of land bounded by a line commencing at a point where the eastern boundary of Commonwealth Avenue intersects the inner boundary of State Circle and proceeding thence in a northerly direction along the eastern boundary of Commonwealth Avenue until it intersections the southern shore of the Lake, thence in a generally easterly direction along that shore until it intersects the western boundary of Kings Avenue, thence in a south westerly direction along that boundary until it intersects the inner boundary of State Circle, and thence clockwise around that inner boundary to the point of commencement.

Capital Hill includes the land enclosed by State Circle, and that part of the road reserve of State Circle immediately adjacent to Capital Hill.

Figure 11: Parliamentary Zone Precinct LocationFigure 11: The Parliamentary Zone Precinct location

4.3.2 Background

The Parliamentary Zone Precinct is the physical manifestation of Australian democratic government and the home of the nation’s most importance cultural and judicial institutions and symbols. The Parliamentary Zone is the symbolic heart of the National Capital and is at the geometric centre of the Griffins’ plans for Canberra.

4.3.3 Objectives for the Parliamentary Zone Precinct

The Parliamentary Zone will be given meaning as the place of the people, accessible to all Australians so that they can more fully understand and appreciate the collective experience and rich diversity of this country.

To do this, the place of the people must reflect:

  • the political and cultural role of Australia’s Capital
  • federation and Australian democracy
  • the achievements of individual Australians in all areas of endeavour
  • the diversity of Australia, its peoples, natural environments, cultures and heritage
  • the unique qualities of Australian creativity and craftsmanship.

The place of the people must have:

  • a sense of scale, dignity and openness
  • a cohesive and comprehensible layout
  • a large forum for public ceremony and debate
  • intimate, enjoyable spaces for individuals and regions
  • a dynamic program of national, state and regional events
  • accessible and affordable public facilities.

To realise the Parliamentary Zone as the place of the people it will be important to:

  • balance politics and culture
  • welcome people
  • celebrate Australian history and society
  • represent Australian excellence
  • emphasise the importance of the public realm
  • make access easy and open
  • reinforce the integrity of the visual structure
  • strengthen the relationship between buildings and landscape
  • create a variety of urban spaces
  • establish comprehensive design management polices for the future.

For each of these objectives, stated intentions that will guide all developmental and cultural and physical planning and management are as follows.

Objective Intention

Balance politics and culture

locate national cultural institutions and key government agencies in the place of the people

facilitate the staging of cultural and political events, activities and ceremonies provide opportunities to recognise Australian endeavour

Welcome people

encourage the diverse population of Australia to visit

provide spaces that are pleasant and sheltered

improve the level of amenity and engender vitality (cafés, events, picnic spaces, etcetera)

establish a program of appropriate events and activities in quality venues

provide visitor-friendly public transport and car parking

discourage through-traffic and encourage pedestrians and cyclists

make it easy for people to find their destination

Celebrate Australian history and society

create ceremonial and community events that reflect our nation's history, spirit and aspirations

recognise the rich history and contribution of the Indigenous Australian people and of our multicultural society

provide opportunities for people to interpret the role of government, the history of our nation and Australian achievement

foster a sense of affinity and attachment to the National Capital

conserve the unique heritage of the Parliamentary Zone for future generations

Represent Australian excellence

encourage the exemplary use of Australian innovation, creativity and diversity

use Australian materials and craftsmanship

demonstrate sustainable management practices

adopt leading practice design and architecture

Emphasise the importance of the public realm

encourage pedestrian activity

improve the amenity of the open spaces

establish a variety of public spaces that will support a range of activities

establish a hierarchy of public spaces with the Land Axis as the principal space

create a major focus for public representation

provide good signage and interpretative systems

Make access easy and open

provide a comprehensive system of paths, cycleways and roads

make public spaces safe

ensure that design is barrier free

improve public transport

locate car parks where they are central, safe and secure

establish well signed, convenient routes to major destinations

clearly identify the front entries to buildings

Reinforce the integrity of the visual structure

maintain the integrity and prominence of the Land Axis

symbolically recognise the intersection of the Land Axis and Water Axis

emphasise Commonwealth and Kings Avenues as landscape edges

align buildings normal to the Land Axis and Water Axis and to the Griffins’ proposed terraces

enhance the existing character and quality of the landscape

use lighting to emphasise the organisational structure, buildings and other special features

plant trees to reflect seasonal changes

Strengthen the relationship between buildings and landscape

provide ordered settings and relate buildings of similar functions, using the existing buildings as the focus

locate a central court for each development region

provide clear address and identity for all buildings from the central court

align buildings normal to the Land Axis and Water Axis

establish vistas from the Land Axis to the central development courts

enhance seasonal, day and night landscape settings for buildings

Create a variety of urban spaces

establish a sequence of spaces that range from the Land Axis to the development courts

provide a major focus for public representation and gatherings of national interest

create spaces that will support vibrant activities of discovery and others for reflection or quiet enjoyment

link buildings and places with a legible road and pathway network

Establish comprehensive design management polices for the future

reserve sites for new buildings

plan for a mix of appropriate future functions and land uses

establish a viable financial framework for development and management

provide a defined role for private capital, patronage and sponsorship

develop sustainable environmental management practices

conserve the unique heritage of the Parliamentary Zone for future generations

4.3.4 Land use for Parliamentary Zone Precinct

Land use for the Parliamentary Zone should be in accordance with Figure 12.

Figure 12: Land Use for Parliamentary Zone precinctFigure 12: Land use for the Parliamentary Zone Precinct

Permitted land uses for ‘Mixed Use’ are:

  • Commercial Accommodation (Hotel, Motel and Serviced Apartments only)
  • Community Use
  • National Association Office
  • National Capital Use
  • Office
  • Parliamentary Use
  • Place of Assembly.

Permitted ancillary land uses for ‘Mixed Use’ are:

  • Café
  • Car Park
  • Child Care Centre
  • Consulting Rooms
  • Personal Services Establishment
  • Retail
  • Restaurant.

4.3.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

Formation of campuses

Identifiable precincts, or campuses, should be created to provide a sensible and flexible rationale for the location of new buildings, public spaces, commemorative works and even some events.

Essentially, the policy is to use the existing buildings as 'anchors' for new development that has a compatible function. For example, a new government agency could be sited adjacent to either the John Gorton or Treasury buildings, while a new visual arts building could be located near the National Gallery of Australia. Similarly, any planned extensions to Parliament would be ideally placed on what was Camp Hill between the Old and New Houses of Parliament.

While the existing buildings will determine the character of the functions and uses for each campus, a court, plaza or garden should provide the focus to their layout. Each building in the campus, existing and new, should have a pedestrian entry fronting the court, and the courts themselves should be developed so that they encourage people to use them for informal lunch time sports, or for celebrations or perhaps protests.

The existing buildings will also influence the architectural and landscape character for each of the campuses. Urban design guidelines addressing aspects such as form, materials, scale and footprint should ensure that successive development contributes to the integrity of the campus. Gradually this will break the Zone into distinguishable precincts, which in turn will make the Zone more visitor-friendly.

To ensure that people can move easily between the campuses, the campuses will be connected by paths and vistas created from one central court to the other. To ensure that people can orientate themselves in the Zone, view corridors from the courts to the Lake or Parliament House will also be established.

Five campuses are to be formed in the Zone, with Parliament House as a sixth, as follows:

  • 'Parliamentary Executive' campus, centred on Old Parliament House
  • 'Treasury' campus around that building
  • 'John Gorton' campus around that building
  • 'Humanities and Science' campus, built around the National Library of Australia and the National Science and Technology Centre
  • 'Arts and Civic' campus built around the National Gallery of Australia and the High Court of Australia.

The general arrangement of each of these campuses is identified in Figure 13.

Figure 13: Parliamentary Zone - Formation of campusesFigure 13: Parliamentary Zone - Formation of campuses

Land use and development

For the place of the people to remain relevant, a balance should be maintained between the working political functions of the seat of Government and the national cultural institutions.  Major shifts in this balance would make the Parliamentary Zone into either a theme park of attractions or an office environment devoid of people outside of working hours.

Permissible land uses include parliamentary uses, appropriate National Capital uses and other uses that enhance the function and character of the area.

In recognition of an anticipated 50-year timeframe for future developments including buildings, landscapes and associated works, a number of sites within the Parliamentary Zone should be reserved for future use in four main categories:

  • Seat of Government – Commonwealth Parliament of Australia
  • Seat of Government – Agencies of the Commonwealth of Australia
  • national (cultural) institutions
  • facilities and amenities for the public.

In the event that Parliament House needs to expand to accommodate growth in its working population, expansion should be directed into the two existing car parks located either side of Federation Mall between East Block and West Block. Buildings should be three storeys in addition to multi-level basement car parking.

Future growth of government agency functions should be directed into the campuses located around the Treasury and John Gorton buildings. Because they are near the centre of the Parliamentary Zone and house large worker populations, these two campuses should also be the locations for low-scale structured car parks. The car parks may additionally house future shuttle bus services, as well as limited retail amenities such as dry cleaners, newsagents and flower shops.

Any future expansion of the National Gallery of Australia and the National Archives of Australia should occur on sites adjacent to the present locations of these national institutions.

Any long-term requirements for new cultural institutions should also be accommodated in the proposed campuses. There are ample new building sites (many currently used for surface parking) associated with the Arts and Civic campus and the Humanities and Science Campus.

The site to the west of the Land Axis and east of Parkes Place West (currently a surface car park) is a high profile site. The site should be reserved for a significant national building and/or a significant national place of special status and interest.

King Edward Terrace should develop a 'mainstream character' over time with intersection changes, additional pedestrian crossings, broader paths and more consistent avenue planting. To reinforce this character, concessions and convenient services for the public should be provided along the Terrace.

Finally, the new focus of public activities in the place of the people, the area adjoining the south side of Queen Elizabeth Terrace on the lake edge and centred on the Land Axis, should provide amenities and facilities such as restaurants, coffee shops, and exhibitions for the public.

Roads and traffic

Traffic is an important aspect of realising the objectives for the Parliamentary Zone. Commonwealth and Kings Avenues are major traffic routes connecting the north and south of Canberra and both carry large volumes of peak hour traffic. More importantly, commuters travelling to and from City, Barton and Fyshwick use the east-west roads that go through the Parliamentary Zone, i.e. King Edward, King George and Queen Victoria Terraces.

A disproportionate amount of through-traffic uses King Edward Terrace and as a consequence there is a number of traffic and pedestrian safety matters.

To assist in ameliorating some of the through-traffic, a number of improvements to the road layout and design should be introduced progressively. These include:

  • Establishing a legible hierarchy in the roads by giving each a different character, drawn from variables such as the road surface and width, avenue planting and directional signage. In this way Commonwealth and Kings Avenues will be distinguished as the primary access roads, King Edward and King George Terraces as secondary address roads and Parkes Place, Queen Victoria Terrace and Federation Mall as the tertiary distributors. The lanes within the campuses that lead to building entries or to car parks should be developed as shared zones for pedestrians and cars.
  • Changing King Edward Terrace from a thoroughfare to a main street. This can be achieved by creating 'T' intersections and traffic lights at its junctions with Commonwealth and Kings Avenues, by rationalising the number of entry points to the campuses and by adding pedestrian crossing points to provide continuity in the path system. With the exception of service vehicles and tourist coaches, a load limit should also be considered as a traffic calming and safety measure.
  • Removing Bowen Place, Flynn Place, and the straight sections of Langton Crescent and Dorothy Tangney Place. These roads were built to a large scale in the expectation that Parliament House would be built on the lakeshore rather than on Capital Hill. Their removal is possible if 'T' intersections are made at the intersections of King Edward Terrace, Commonwealth and Kings Avenues.

Pedestrian pathways

Direct, sheltered paths connecting major destinations will substantially improve the public realm of the Parliamentary Zone. Encouraging people to leave their cars in one destination and to explore the attractions of the Zone as pedestrians will add to the vibrancy and life of the place of the people.

A legible and consistent path system that connects all the parts of the Parliamentary Zone will be introduced gradually and progressively.

The first paths to be installed should be in the northern part of the Zone, linking King Edward Terrace and the Lake. Linking with the pathways that now terminate at the northern edge of Parkes Place, the new paths should run down each side of the open space that forms the Land Axis to the Lake. Pedestrian crossings are to be provided on King Edward Terrace along these paths at appropriate points to afford a safe pedestrian environment.

In the vicinity of Old Parliament House, the existing perimeter roads should be upgraded through the use of extended paving to enhance pedestrian movement but in a manner that has regard to the conservation values of the historic setting of the building and still capable of meeting the functional requirements of the building. This would give the building an appropriate, dignified setting and create a generous new pedestrian environment. To further connect Old Parliament House with the other parts of the Parliamentary Zone, some form of secondary entry should be created at the rear of the building facing Parliament House.

In association with the paths, cycle access for both commuter and recreational cyclists will be provided. The cycleway network should be linked to the existing system, encouraging access and especially cycling around the Lake. All major attractions should be similarly connected, and secure facilities for cycle storage should be installed at these locations.

Orientation and interpretation

Good orientation and interpretation will help to create a positive first impression and an enjoyable experience for people visiting the Parliamentary Zone and assist their understanding about the National Capital.

A hierarchical signage system to assist people in finding their way around the Parliamentary Zone and reinforce it as a special area is to be produced. The system should include:

  • identification signs that relate to street entrances of the key national institutions and public places
  • secondary signs that relate to the public entrances of the buildings
  • directional signs for traffic and pedestrians to indicate the routes to buildings and other destinations
  • information signs on services for pedestrians and tourists
  • interpretative signs providing information about places, events and venues.

This system should ensure continuity in the form of the sign, consistency in message content and easy updating and extension.

Interpretative signs are to be included at commemorative and dedication points and at the entrances to gardens, places and venues. These signs should provide brief notes on the historical background, cultural significance and importance of these places

Tree planting

Tree planting is fundamental to the enduring design concept of Canberra and to the character and structure of the city. It is the formal tree planting that reflects the ground pattern of roads and formal spaces and establishes their character and beauty. New planting should be introduced and existing planting strengthened and conserved to attract native birdlife and create shelter, scale, interest and a special character to each of the campuses.

The Land Axis and Commonwealth and Kings Avenues are important elements in making the Parliamentary Zone legible. To maintain the definition of the geometry of the Zone, there must be a long-term strategy for the replacement of trees.

With its central location, length, width and the stark contrast between the turf and the eucalypts, the Land Axis has a powerful presence in the Parliamentary Zone. Trees should be replaced and the planting extended where appropriate to preserve the visual strength of the Land Axis.

The tree planting on Commonwealth and Kings Avenues reflects different attitudes to avenue planting over the generations. There is an assortment of native, coniferous and deciduous species that requires rationalisation. The original design intent of the avenue planting – to provide a backdrop of coniferous evergreen trees contrasting with the deciduous trees at the street edge – made the avenues legible in the broader landscape and distinctive throughout the seasons. A consistent approach to replacement tree planting should be undertaken to reinstate this intent.

There are other formal spaces that reflect the Griffins’ Plan with its terracing, and the 1920s road layout. These spaces and streets, which include Parkes Place and Queen Victoria, King George and King Edward Terraces, create a series of important cross axes and lateral spaces. The trees that establish these spaces are a mixture of exotic evergreen and deciduous species.

A consistent approach to replacement planting should be adopted to conserve the clarity and character of these spaces. For example, red autumn foliage along the avenues, with accents of yellow at intersection points, will help to define special routes and places of interest. The brighter foliage of deciduous trees will also emphasise the major regionings of buildings and offer sun and shade control at various times of the year.

The East-West promenade between the National Gallery of Australia and the National Library of Australia will create a major new lateral space. Here, tree planting should be used to identify this as a new cross axis mimicking the older tree planting of the avenues.

Indicative development plan

The Indicative Development Plan at Figure 14 indicates how growth and development is intended to look in the long term. The Indicative Development Plan should be used to guide all future planning and development in the Parliamentary Zone.

Figure 14: Parliamentary Zone - Indicative development plan


4.4 Barton Precinct Code

4.4.1 Precinct Location

The Barton Precinct is bounded by Kings Avenue and the Parliamentary Zone to the north and the edge of Lake Burley Griffin to the east. The southern perimeter runs along Brisbane Avenue, down National Circuit around Sydney Avenue and ends at Canberra Avenue. State Circle and the curtilage of St Andrew’s Church form the western boundary of the precinct.

Figure 11: Barton Precinct LocationFigure 15: Barton Precinct location

4.4.2 Background

Barton has long been recognised as a prestigious office location and is characterised by a series of large buildings set in a generous landscape setting. A number of key government agencies are located in the area, including the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Australian Federal Police, Australian National Audit Office, Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet and the Attorney-General’s Department. Smaller Australian Government agencies and private sector offices (often providing services to government) have also established in Barton.

4.4.3 Objectives for Barton Precinct

  1. Ensure the highest standards of architecture for all buildings in the precinct.
  2. Ensure that individual buildings contribute to the coherent definition of streets, blocks and public spaces intended for the Precinct.
  3. Create a legible network of paths and streets and enhance connectivity and accessibility to the Lake.
  4. Encourage a mix of land uses which contribute to the vibrancy, amenity and convenience of the Barton Precinct as an attractive place in which to work and live.
  5. Ensure new development meets leading practice for environmental sustainability including energy efficiency and water sensitive urban design measures.
  6. Ensure development recognises and complements the precinct character; as a major employment centre and area of national importance.
  7. Recognise and reinforce the different streetscapes associated with Kings, Brisbane, and Sydney Avenues, and State Circle.

4.4.4 Land Use for Barton Precinct

Land use for the Barton Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 16.

Figure 12: Land Use for Barton PrecinctFigure 16: Land use for the Barton Precinct

4.4.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

Building height

A building height limit of RL 591 generally applies to the Barton area. This level corresponds with the level of the parapet walls at all four corners of Parliament Drive and establishes an appropriate limit in terms of creating and maintaining built form relationships to Parliament House when seen from vantage points in and around the Central National Area.

Minor building elements (such as lift overruns and roof plant) that extend building height above RL 591 will be considered where this enhances the architectural quality of the building, and fosters energy efficiency, indoor amenity, appropriate urban scale, and adds visual interest to the skyline. Minor building elements should be carefully integrated within the form of buildings.

Lift overruns, plant rooms and any roof mounted aerials, masts and dishes should be designed and sited to have a low visual impact when viewed from the street or Parliament House.

At Section 1 Barton, buildings up to RL 602, inclusive of plant and roof height, may be considered where they add visual interest to the skyline and are set back from the Main Avenue frontages. Individual consideration will also be given to special vertical elements such as a spire or tower associated with a cathedral building on Block 31 Section 6 Barton.

Buildings should be a minimum of four storeys on the Main Avenue frontages of Kings Avenue, Brisbane Avenue and Sydney Avenue.

Landscaping

A high quality of landscape design is sought and mature trees are to be retained wherever possible.

Street trees and other large trees are to be planted in deep-root soil conditions.

Pedestrian and bicycle movement

Windsor Walk will be constructed and landscaped to form the main pedestrian spine through the Barton Precinct.

Cycle ways and pedestrian paths will be provided to enable safe and convenient movement and should connect to major peripheral paths.

Pedestrian safety and visual amenity should be secured through traffic calming and appropriate streetscape design.

New development should provide a positive address to pedestrian areas, to provide visual interest, activity and passive surveillance. Blank façades and exposed service areas should generally be avoided.

Opportunities for linking the pedestrian networks of the Barton Precinct with the surrounding areas such as the trail system in the peripheral parklands of Parliament House should be addressed by new developments, particularly in the development of Section 1 Barton.

Sustainable development

Promote environmentally sustainable development including increased pedestrian and cycle accessibility and public transport use while reducing dependency on private vehicles.

Off site works

Public domain works and site infrastructure should be implemented concurrently with new adjoining development.

New developments may be required to provide public infrastructure, including adjacent access roads and landscaped public spaces such as Windsor Walk, in accordance with detailed development requirements set by the National Capital Authority.

Location Specific

York Park Area

Background

The development of York Park and environs is primarily to accommodate prestigious offices requiring proximity to Parliament House. York Park occupies a prominent site in the Central National Area and contributes to the urban form and landscape features which give the National Capital its special character and setting. It forms part of the backdrop and approaches to Parliament House and an edge to the National Triangle at Kings Avenue. York Park has a key role in the daily functions of government, provides sites for the headquarters of major national associations and plays an international role in receiving visiting officials and dignitaries. Consequently, it is necessary that development of York Park and its public domain should achieve design excellence of a high order.

‘York Park’ is the gazetted name of the areas contained within Sections 1 and 15 Barton and Section 29 Forrest (named after commemorative tree plantings by HRH the Duke of York in 1927). However, for the purposes of the Precinct Code ‘York Park’ refers also to the environs beyond these Sections and includes all of the area between National Circuit, Canberra Avenue, State Circle and Kings Avenue.

Objectives for York Park area

The York Park area should be developed primarily as a prestigious office area and landscape setting to satisfy demand for office accommodation requiring proximity to Parliament House.

The urban structure and character of York Park should reflect the geometry and intent of the Griffins’ plans, and provide a legible hierarchy of streets and public spaces.

Development should respect the geometry and symbolic intent of the Griffins’ plans, particularly the vistas to and from Parliament House and the connections to national institutions, monuments and landscape spaces in and around the Parliamentary Zone.

Architectural excellence is essential for development in York Park, commensurate with its location adjacent to Parliament House.

High quality landscape design is essential for the development of York Park as a prestigious setting for National Capital uses and offices.

The landscape design of streets, pedestrian paths and open spaces of York Park should consist of a range of formal and informal spaces that reinforce the Griffin geometry and contribute to the landscape setting of Parliament House.

The public domain of York Park should provide for places for local recreation with a high level of pedestrian amenity.

Individual buildings should contribute to the coherent definition of streets, blocks and public spaces, form the public domain of the precinct, and contribute to the public domain’s active pedestrian qualities.

Greater use of public transport should be encouraged, particularly for the journey to work. As should less, or more efficient, use of private transport.

Safe and convenient movement systems for pedestrians and cyclists should be provided within the precinct.

Significant natural and heritage values of the area should be identified and protected.

Land use for York Park area

Development and redevelopment should accord with the detailed conditions of planning, design and development below.

Permitted land uses for the York Park area generally are:

  • Diplomatic Mission (with the exception of Blocks 3 and 15 Section 22 Barton)
  • National Capital Use
  • Office (which may include Commonwealth offices and offices for national associations)
  • Open Space.

Permitted ancillary uses are:

  • Retail
  • Personal Service Establishment
  • Child Care Centre.

Additional permitted land uses for Blocks 3 and 15 Section 22 Barton are:

  • Commercial Accommodation (not including a caravan park/camping ground)
  • Residential
  • Additional permitted ancillary land uses for Blocks 3 and 15 Section 22 Barton are:
    • Cafés
    • Restaurants.

Commercial parking structures in the York Park area are to be located where identified on the Indicative Development Plan at Figure 17. Retail and Personal Service Establishments are permitted at the ground level of parking structures as ancillary small scale facilities.

Retail and Personal Service Establishments should be provided at the ground floor level of Offices and structured Car Parks in the location identified for a ‘Retail Plaza’ on the Indicative Development Plans at Figure 17 and Figure 20.

Large spaces for recreation are to be provided at either end of Windsor Walk including a large space suitable for active recreation at the Canberra Avenue end of Windsor Walk as depicted in Figure 17.

Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

Building orientation

Buildings are to be sited parallel with the Avenues (Kings Avenue, Brisbane Avenue and Sydney Avenue), with National Circuit and State Circle, to provide definition to the geometry of the Griffin’s Plans with built form.

Car parking

Surface car parks are inappropriate as foreground to the views from Parliament House and, to the extent they are permitted on a temporary basis, they are to be carefully screened with landscaping.

Basement car parks should be constructed below finished ground level and concealed from public streets and pedestrian areas.

Multi storey parking structures are to be designed to minimise their visual and physical impacts on the important public streetscapes of the Main Avenues and Windsor Walk.

A parking structure, if provided on the corner of Windsor Walk and Brisbane Avenue, should be located behind a screen of habitable retail/office buildings with address frontages to Brisbane Avenue and Windsor Walk and integrated in design with the retail/office buildings.

Particular attention should be given to the design of roofing to parking structures to relieve the visual impact of large roof areas. A maximum height below RL 591 may apply to parking structures to relieve their visual and physical impact on the public domain.

Undercroft parking, that is, open parking basements projecting above ground level, will only be permitted where the National Capital Authority is satisfied that it does not limit the opportunity to create attractive landscape areas, and will not be permitted on public street frontages and Windsor Walk.

Parking policies for the York Park area are designed to encourage greater use of public transport for the journey to work.

An overall reduction in the total long-term car parking provision is proposed. This will be achieved by initially limiting the amount of on-site parking permitted in new developments.

On-site car parking should be provided, at a rate of 1 space per 100 square metres of gross floor area, for new offices approved in the York Park area. A higher on-site and/or off-site provision may be required by the National Capital Authority in specific cases, after taking into account the relationship between on-site parking, off-site parking opportunities and the capacity of public transport in the area.

Parking for non-office uses will be provided at rates consistent with the standards of the ACT Government.

Surface car parks on unleased land will be progressively replaced by strategically located multi-level parking structures and/or underground parking areas. Supplementary car parking in temporary surface car parks may be provided pending the development of these parking facilities.

If for specific sites the National Capital Authority determines that the amount of parking to be provided should be above the minimum on-site amount specified in the requirement above, this additional parking may be provided either on-site, or by way of a contribution to the ACT Government for off-site provision of that parking in the locality, or by a combination of these methods.

Building height

To protect the integrity of views to and from Parliament House, development is generally limited to a maximum height of RL 591.

On Section 1 Barton, buildings up to RL 602, inclusive of plant and roof height, may be considered where they add visual interest to the skyline, are set back from the Main Avenue frontages, and ensure that Parliament House remains pre-eminent in views from elevated viewing points such as Mount Ainslie and from the East Basin of Lake Burley Griffin.

As Parliament House is sited above York Park, the roofscapes of buildings warrant particular attention. Roof plant is to be carefully integrated and enclosed within the roof form. Minor roofscape elements will be permitted to extend above the RL 591 height limit, to an extent not exceeding that of the RG Casey building, to add visual interest to the skyline.

Buildings should be a minimum of four storeys on the Main Avenue frontages.

Building setbacks

Building setbacks have been established for Kings, Sydney and Brisbane Avenues within the York Park area as follows:

  • 15 metres for buildings along Kings Avenue
  • ten metres on Brisbane Avenue
  • six metres on Sydney Avenue.

On State Circle, a variable setback of a minimum of 20 metres is to apply, to allow the buildings to merge visually and spatially with the informal character of the woodland landscape surrounding Capital Hill.

Building articulation and entries

Drop off points and minor architectural elements, which articulate and enhance the building elevation, will be considered within front setback zones.

High quality paving, lighting and bollards, integrated with soft landscape treatments, are required within site boundaries to complement the standards set and maintained in the public domain.

All buildings on blocks with a frontage to Kings, Brisbane or Sydney Avenue should generally have a significant entry facing the avenue.

Spaces in front of building setbacks are to be landscaped to reinforce the theme of York Park as prestigious buildings in a landscape setting.

External security barriers, if required, such as bollards and retaining walls, should be designed as integral and attractive elements of the civic landscape of York Park.

Services and service entries should be concealed from Main Avenues and pedestrian pathways.

The number of vehicle crossings should be kept to a minimum, to enhance the amenity and safety of pedestrian paths.

Landscape

The landscape setting of York Park will consist of a range of formal and informal spaces that reinforce the geometry of the Griffins’ plans and contribute to the setting of Parliament House.

Landscape design in York Park will be of a high quality, commensurate with the location adjacent to Parliament House and places of national significance within the Central National Area.

Landscaping of frontages to State Circle will generally be informal, and similar in character to the native woodlands surrounding Parliament House, in order to visually connect York Park to Capital Hill and contribute to its landscape setting.

The design of car parking areas and arrival courts should incorporate generously scaled tree planting beds to provide shade and separation to parking bays. Quality streetscape furnishings and paving treatments are to be utilised to provide visual relief to surface car parks and vehicular areas within or adjacent to places characterised by higher levels of pedestrian use.

Building form

High quality, prestigious and durable building materials are required to be used for all developments.

New buildings should complement, but not necessarily imitate, the style, colour, form, scale and finishes of surrounding buildings.

Unpainted or galvanised metal will not be permitted on roofs, parapets or fascias.

Lift overruns, plant rooms and any roof mounted aerials, masts and dishes should be designed and sited to have a low visual impact when viewed from the street or Parliament House.

Internal courtyards of office buildings should generally provide deep in-ground planting conditions and be of a dimension suitable for establishing large trees.

Open Space

Windsor Walk is to serve as a central linear park and continuous pedestrian spine connecting public car parks, office destinations, the proposed retail plaza and a variety of landscaped recreation areas. It is to provide spaces for active recreation as well as quiet outdoor places for workers to enjoy during the day. Nodes of intimate formal parks are to be developed as accents within an otherwise informal woodland character extending the length of the walk. Larger spaces for recreation are to be provided at either end of Windsor Walk.

Windsor Walk is to be developed and retained as landscaped open space. Windsor Walk will be constructed and landscaped to form the main pedestrian spine through the York Park precinct.

Figure 17 - York Park Master PlanFigure 17: York Park Masterplan – Indicative development plan
Figure 18 - York Park Master Plan - Indicative SectionsFigure 18: York Park Masterplan – Indicative sections (1)
Figure 19 - York Park Master Plan - Indicative Sections 2

Figure 19: York Park Masterplan – Indicative sections (2)

Figure 20 - York Park Master Plan - Indicative Sections 3

Figure 20: York Park Masterplan – Indicative sections (3)

Other Sites

Block 25 Section 6 Barton

Land use policy

Permitted land uses are:

  • Bar
  • Café
  • Office
  • Residential

Car parking

Car parking must be provided at the rates specified for Section 9 Barton.

Section 10 Barton (Kurrajong Hotel)

Objective

The objective for Section 10 Barton is to enable the Hotel Kurrajong and its setting to be used as a Hotel and Hotel School without detriment to its heritage values.

Land use policy

Permitted land uses are:

  • Hotel
  • Educational Establishment
  • Open Space.

Block 3 Section 10 Barton is to be retained and maintained as public open space by the lessee, giving special consideration to heritage values of Hotel Kurrajong.

Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

  • Landscape and building development works on Section 10 Barton should give special consideration to the heritage values of Hotel Kurrajong.
  • Development must address street frontages.
Blocks 3, 4 & 6 Section 29 and Blocks 2, 3, 9 & 11 Section 30 Forrest

Objective

To allow office development in addition to National Capital Use purposes to enable the York Park precinct to achieve its maximum potential as an office employment area

Land use policy

Permitted land uses are:

  • Diplomatic Mission
  • National Capital Use
  • Office.
Blocks 4 and 5 Section 1 Barton

Objective

To allow development for National Capital Use in the southern part of the Block and for purposes consistent with protection of the whole heritage listed York Park North Tree Plantation (commonly known as the Oak Plantation) at the northern end of the block, and to include provision for parking, either in basements and/ or in a parking structure, and ancillary/small scale retail and personal services at building ground level

Land use policy

Permitted land uses are:

  • National Capital Use
  • Open Space.

Permitted ancillary uses are:

  • Car Park
  • Retail (small scale shop), Personal Services Establishment, Café, Bar and Restaurant at building ground level and within a car park structure if provided.
Section 6 Barton

Background

The Riverside site on Section 6 Barton occupies a prestigious position in the Central National Area and is prominent in views from vantage points north of the Lake and on approaches to the Parliamentary Zone. It is critical that the form and scale of development of this key site contributes to Kings Avenue and forms an appropriate built form flanking the Parliamentary Zone. All development in this area of Barton is to be of a consistently high design quality befitting its national significance.

The detailed conditions of planning, design and development for the development of the Section 6 are determined by its:

  • prominent location within the Central National Area
  • proximity to the Parliamentary Zone and Kings Avenue
  • relationship to the Lake and associated parklands
  • north sloping terrain which provides panoramic views over the Lake
  • visual prominence from vantage points north of the Lake.

The aim is that the Riverside site, together with development on the opposite block, Section 9 Barton, will become an important public precinct with the development of residential and community uses in close proximity to the office employment areas of Barton and Parkes.

Objectives

Encourage high density residential development, together with appropriate forms of commercial accommodation and other minor commercial uses.

Provide residential development that enables people to live close to a major office employment centre and take advantage of the panoramic views that the site affords.

Facilitate the development of small scale commercial land uses, such as commercial accommodation, restaurants, cafés and tourist uses to complement the permitted land uses.

Encourage a diversity of land uses that will enhance the Parliamentary Zone and attract day and night activities into the formal areas of the National Capital.

Land use policy

The permitted land use for Block 22 Section 6 is:

  • Residential

Other land uses permitted, ancillary to the above uses, are:

  • Commercial Accommodation
  • Community Facility
  • Recreation
  • Retail.

Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

All future buildings on the Riverside site should conform with the following principles:

  • Long façades should be broken up by using colonnades, pergolas, and through the use of sun shading emphasising the play of light and shade.
  • Creating openings in masonry structures.
  • Continuous glazing and reflective glass is not permitted.
  • Identifying entrances through the inclusion of canopies, porte-cochere and covered ways.
  • Limiting the range of materials and colours to those in the off-white to ochre range; stark white materials are not permitted.
  • Concealing lift overruns and plant rooms within pitched roofs.

Building height

A maximum height limit of RL591 has been established for the Barton area including this site. Individual consideration will be given to special vertical elements such as a spire or tower associated with a cathedral building on Block 31 Section 6 Barton.

The height limit establishes a maximum height for commercial buildings flanking Blackall Street with residential, community and other ancillary uses being located in buildings located closer to the Lake, following the sloping terrain of the site and stepping down to three and two levels for the building nearer Bowen Drive.

Built form

The built form should have regard for the site topography, stepping down the slope in terraced levels presenting a series of building ‘fingers’ interspersed with landscaped zones fanning around the contours.

The built form for residential development should be a minimum height of three levels and a maximum of four levels (one being a covered car parking level).

Unbroken, wall like façades will not be permitted. Terraces, balconies, roof decks and awnings are encouraged as a means of modulating façades.

Building setbacks

Buildings should be set back at least six metres from Blackall Street with a 10 metre landscaped setback from Bowen Drive and satisfy the relevant ACT criteria regarding noise standards.

Access and parking

Primary vehicle access is to be from Blackall Street. With the exception of a limited amount of visitor parking, all car parking should be contained in structures (in basements or decked) and screened from external view.

Building materials

Unpainted galvanised metal will not be permitted on roofs, parapets or fascias.

Pedestrian and bicycle movement

A pedestrian pathway/easement through the site is to link Blackall Street to Bowen Drive and the edge of the Lake.

Section 9 Barton

Objectives for Section 9 Barton

Provide for the development of mixed use facilities, including office, retail and residential, incorporating a car parking structure and active street frontages.

Promote a range of land uses including Office, Residential, Retail, Café and Restaurant which contribute to the vibrancy, amenity and convenience of Barton as an attractive place in which to work and live.

Provide a prestigious development reflecting the national significance of Barton in the Central National Area.

Provide a scale of development commensurate with accessibility of the site to nearby infrastructure, cultural attractions and parklands and its location within the Central National Area.

Provide a scale of development that increases private investment in the precinct to deliver public infrastructure including local retail and professional services, café/restaurant establishments, and a parking structure.

Promote environmentally sustainable development including increased pedestrian accessibility and public transport use while reducing dependency on private vehicles.

Land use for Section 9 Barton

Permitted land uses for Section 9 (shown as Land Use A in Figure 16) are:

  • Bank and Cooperative Society
  • Café, Bar, Restaurant
  • Car Park
  • Child Care Centre
  • Commercial Accommodation (Serviced Apartments only)
  • Consulting Rooms
  • Office
  • Open Space
  • Personal Service Establishment
  • Residential
  • Retail.

Detailed conditions of planning, design and development for Section 9 Barton

Building height

To protect the integrity of views to and from Parliament House, development should be limited to a height of RL591.

Minor building elements (such as lift overruns and roof plant) that extend building height above RL591 will be considered where this enhances the architectural quality of the building, and fosters energy efficiency, indoor amenity, appropriate urban scale, and adds visual interest to the skyline. Minor building elements should be carefully integrated within the form of buildings.

Figure 21 - Section 9 Barton - Indicative building height and formFigure 21: Section 9 Barton – Indicative building height and form

Building form

Building and landscaping will need to exhibit design excellence and be designed to ensure protection of the amenity of surrounding buildings and public spaces, including privacy, overlooking and overshadowing.

Individual buildings are to contribute to the coherent definition of blocks and streets generally in accordance with the layout and setbacks. A hierarchy of public spaces and street frontages should be created, with the greatest amount of public activity and building entrances being encouraged on principal streets and at public spaces.

High standards of architecture are sought for the precinct. Modulation of façades, entrances, window bays, sun shading and balconies, and clear articulation of building elements, textures and materials, should provide interest and variety to the streetscape.

Balconies should be of an appropriate size and design to optimise their use and privacy. A minimum dimension of 2.5 metres for at least one balcony per dwelling should be provided and balustrades should be opaque up to at least four storeys from street level.

Active frontages

Active frontages should include shops and entries to buildings. Address frontages will generally be free of service functions and blank walls, with residential and minor commercial addresses encouraged.

Residential frontages may be set back from street boundaries to provide entry porches and a garden interface with the public domain to protect the amenity of residents and contribute to the interest and landscape qualities of the street.

Figure 22 - Section 9 Barton - Indicative active frontagesFigure 22: Section 9 Barton – Indicative active frontages

Parking and access

Large off-street permanent surface car parks are to be avoided. Car parking is to be accommodated in basements and/or in above ground structures concealed from public view. Blank façades to public spaces or streets are not permitted and sculptural elements and urban scale public art is encouraged. The inclusion of these elements can assist in ascribing different meanings to buildings, and provides the opportunity to characterise not only shelter and functionality, but to interact with our daily lives.

Some short stay on-street car parking should be provided to support retail uses, pedestrian amenity and after hours activity.

Car parking standards

Car parking for development should accord with the following rates:

  • Residential; Commercial Accommodation (Serviced Apartment only):
    • 5 spaces per 100 square metres of gross floor area.
  • Bank; Child Care Centre; Consulting Rooms; Cooperative Society; Office; Personal Service Establishment:
    • two spaces per 100 square metres of gross floor area.
  • Restaurant, Bar, Café; Retail:
    • 5 spaces per 100 metres of gross floor area.

A higher on-site and/or off-site parking provision may be required by the National Capital Authority after taking into account the relationship between on-site parking, off-site parking opportunities and the capacity of public transport in the area at the time of development.

The proponent must provide the National Capital Authority a long term parking strategy for construction staging which minimises disruption to parking. The parking strategy must be adopted in the first stage of development to accommodate a minimum of 470 displaced car parking spaces.

Access to the site (for parking and site servicing) should be from the side and access street generally.

Additional parking should be provided for vehicles associated with less consumption of energy. These include bicycles, motorcycles, small cars and car-sharing vehicles.

Car parking structures should provide secure storage and related facilities for bicycle users. This would position the development as a local centre for commuting and recreational cyclists, as well as providing the opportunity for an alternative mode of transport between the many office buildings in the locale.

Figure 23: Section 9 Barton – Indicative parking and access
Figure 24 - Section 9 Barton - Indicative street sectionsFigure 24: Section 9 Barton – Indicative street sections

Landscape/streetscape

Paving, lighting, street trees and planting beds should be of high quality and should reinforce the amenity and visual quality of the pedestrian environment. Street trees and other large trees are to be planted in deep-root soil conditions. Existing large trees are to be retained (where possible).

Figure 25 - Section 9 Barton - Indicative landscape and streetscapeFigure 25: Section 9 Barton – Indicative landscape/streetscape

Public domain and off-site works

A retail plaza is to be provided on the corner of Macquarie Street and the side street (see Figure 26) and furnished with lighting, seating and paving to provide an attractive public area for outdoor cafés and restaurants.

The developer is to carry out off-site works to create a high quality public domain commensurate with a vibrant and attractive mixed use precinct.

On-street parking, verge landscaping, paving, lighting and furniture should be provided using high quality durable materials.

Sustainable development

Development proposals will demonstrate a high level of performance in terms of environmental design including energy efficiency, climate management and water sensitive urban design.

Figure 26 - Section 9 Barton - Indicative pedestrian linksFigure 26: Section 9 Barton – Indicative pedestrian links

Public notification

All applications for Works Approval for major development are subject to public notification and consultation. The determination of those applications that constitute major works is at the discretion of the National Capital Authority.


4.5 Deakin/Forrest Residential Area Precinct Code

4.5.1 Precinct location

The Deakin/Forrest Residential Area Precinct comprises the area bounded by State Circle, Canberra Avenue, National Circuit and Adelaide Avenue. The Precinct also encompasses the site of St Andrew’s Church, the Embassy of Italy, Collins Park and diplomatic missions in Red Hill.

Figure 27 - Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct locationFigure 27: Deakin Forrest Residential Area Precinct location

4.5.2 Background

The importance of the Deakin/Forrest residential area stems from its frontage to the Main Avenue of State Circle, its location within the Griffins’ Land Axis, and from its close proximity and relationship to Parliament House. The residential area is an example of the twentieth century ‘Garden City’ planning concepts that the Griffin’s adopted in their designs for Canberra.

The Deakin/Forrest residential area forms part of the original ‘Blandfordia’ subdivision by the Federal Capital Advisory Committee and the Federal Capital Commission, which was based on ‘Garden City’ and ‘City Beautiful’ concepts.

There is a National Capital interest in ensuring that development surrounding, and in close proximity to, Parliament House is of the highest design quality.

4.5.3 Objectives for Deakin/Forrest Residential Area Precinct

  1. The residential areas of Deakin and Forrest that lie between State Circle and National Circuit will maintain and enhance the character of the National Capital and will be planned and developed in accordance with its national significance.
  2. The principle residential character of the area and the use of the land primarily for residential purposes are to continue.
  3. Design of buildings in proximity to the Prime Minister’s Lodge must reflect the dominant urban design character of the locality.

4.5.4 Land use for Deakin/Forrest Residential Area Precinct

Land use for the Deakin/Forrest Residential Area Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 28.

Figure 28 - Land use for the Deakin Forres Residential PrecinctFigure 28: Land use for the Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct

The following uses are permitted on ‘Residential’ blocks:

  • Residential
  • Home Business.

Commercial accommodation including serviced apartments is not permitted.

Permitted land uses for ‘Land Use A’ are:

  • Residential
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Commercial Accommodation (Hotel and Serviced Apartment only).

4.5.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

To ensure excellent urban design for this important residential precinct adjacent to Parliament House, the quantitative standards, with the exception of building height and plot ratio, may be varied where it can be demonstrated that this would result in an excellent urban design outcome. All residential development proposals are subject to public notification and consultation with lessees and residents in the Deakin/ Forrest residential area.

The general development conditions include:

  • The principal residential character of the area and the use of the land for residential purposes are to continue.
  • Development throughout the area, except for sites fronting State Circle, should not be more than two storeys in height and generally no more than eight metres above the natural ground level.
  • Development throughout the area, except for sites fronting State Circle, should have a maximum plot ratio of 0.4.
  • Design of buildings in proximity to the Prime Minister’s Lodge should reflect the dominant urban design character of the locality.
  • Roof mounted aerials, masts and satellite dishes should be located to have a low visual impact.

Location specific

The following conditions apply to residential sites fronting State Circle between Hobart and Adelaide Avenues.

The objectives of these development conditions are to:

  • Provide for high quality residential development of a scale and character appropriate to the setting of Parliament House and the Main Avenue role of State Circle.
  • Protect the residential amenity of rear neighbours in terms of privacy, sunlight access and provision of a landscape buffer.
  • Reduce traffic access from residences to State Circle.
  • Provide for a variety of housing types and sizes.
Block amalgamation

Block amalgamation may involve more than two blocks.

Building height

Any redevelopment of blocks will result in buildings that address State Circle and should be two storeys in height. If blocks are amalgamated three storeys is permissible. If a block is isolated by amalgamation three storeys may be permissible.

Plot ratio

The plot ratio for residential redevelopment of existing blocks is 0.4. If sites are amalgamated the plot ratio may be up to 0.8. An exception applies to blocks flanking Melbourne Avenue (Block 1 Section 6 Forrest and Block 9 Section 3 Deakin) which are permitted to develop to a plot ratio of 0.8 without amalgamation. For other blocks, including blocks isolated by amalgamation, a plot ratio higher than 0.4 and up to a maximum of 0.8 may also be permissible (where it can be demonstrated that this would result in an excellent urban design outcome).

Architecture

Architectural treatment should be of the highest quality, reflecting the prestigious character of the area. The provision of legible entries, accessible from the street, is encouraged as a means of enriching the streetscape. Buildings should be modulated and provided with articulation elements such as porches, balconies, bay window and shade devices, to provide visual interest to the streetscape. Balconies off living areas should generally have a minimum dimension of 2.5 metres.

Due consideration should be given to the roof form and roofscape of buildings. Roof top plant and equipment, if required, should be carefully integrated with the roof form and design of the building and screened from public view from the street. Internal floor to ceiling dimensions should generally be a minimum of 2.7 metres to promote natural lighting and cross-ventilation, consistent with energy efficiency objectives and creation of generously scaled façades.

Vehicle access

Vehicle access should be consistent with the principle shown in Figure 29. Blocks, including amalgamated blocks, with a frontage to a road other than State Circle may have access to that road. Site planning should ensure that vehicles are able to enter and leave the site in a forward direction.

The number of vehicular access points to and from State Circle should be minimised in the interests of traffic safety, convenience and streetscape quality.

Figure 29: Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct - Indicative block amalgamation and access

Building envelopes

Buildings should generally be contained within the building envelopes depicted in Figure 30.

The number of vehicular access points to and from State Circle should be minimised in the interests of traffic safety, convenience and streetscape quality.

Figure 30 - Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct - Building envelopes and setbacks

Figure 30: Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct - Building envelopes and setbacks

Setbacks

Setback from State Circle should be 10 metres. Building articulation elements such as balconies, entries and shading devices may be permitted forward of the primary setback.

The minimum setback of buildings from side boundaries for three storey development is six metres. For two storey development, the minimum side boundary set back may be less than six metres provided it is generally in accordance with the building envelope depicted in Figure 30.

The minimum set back for buildings from rear boundaries for three storey development is generally 18 metres. Lower scale development may occur within the rear landscape zone subject to the protection of privacy, the avoidance of overshadowing and the retention of existing substantial trees.

Car parking

Where the plot ratio exceeds 0.4, car parking other than parking for visitors, should be in a basement. If car parking is in a basement it will not be considered to be part of the Gross Floor Area (GFA) of the building. The basement level is also not considered to be a storey.

The finished floor level of the floor above the basement should not exceed one metre above natural ground level. Vent openings are to be integrated with landscape and architectural elements, and generally concealed from public view.

Undercroft parking, carports, and free standing garages are to be avoided.

Landscape

The front landscape zone to State Circle should be developed to provide a high quality landscape setting with space for planting medium to large trees.

The rear landscape zone is to provide for a substantial landscape buffer that will afford privacy to rear neighbours and maintain winter sunlight to those properties.

The use of hedges is encouraged in lieu of, or combined with, garden walls when forward of the building line. Any front retaining or garden wall should be integrated with the landscape treatments. Garden walls forward of the building line should generally be transparent in character. The maximum average height of fencing should be 1500mm.

Large expanses of exposed paved surfaces except for necessary vehicle driveways, should be avoided.

Off-site works

Off-site works to be provided by the proponent, may be required as part of the approval for development.

Indicative development plan, section and elevation

Development of amalgamated blocks is to be guided by the indicative development plan, section and elevation at Figure 31, Figure 32 and Figure 33 respectively..

Figure 31: Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct – Indicative development plan for State Circle
Figure 32 - Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct - Indicative Elevation for State CircleFigure 32: Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct – Indicative elevation for State Circle
Figure 33 - Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct - Indicative Cross Section for State CircleFigure 33: Deakin Forrest Residential Precinct – Indicative cross section for State Circle

Block 10 Section 13 Forrest

The following conditions apply to Block 10 Section 13 Forrest.

The objectives of these development conditions are to:

  • Ensure excellent urban design for this important precinct on the final approach to the Parliamentary Zone.
  • Provide an opportunity for the development of mixed use facilities, including ‘Residential’, Diplomatic Mission’, and ‘Commercial Accommodation (Hotel and Serviced Apartments only)’.
  • Achieve a built form for the Canberra Avenue frontage similar to other sites adjacent to the final approach to the Parliamentary Zone.
  • Achieve a built form for the State Circle frontage similar to that of the sites fronting State Circle in the Deakin/Forrest residential area.
Building height

Buildings fronting Canberra Avenue are to be a maximum height of RL594. Buildings fronting State Circle are to be a maximum height of RL591.

Plot ratio

The plot ratio for development on Block 10 Section 13 Forrest is 0.8.

Plot ratio

The plot ratio for development on Block 10 Section 13 Forrest is 0.8.

Architecture

Architectural treatment must exhibit design excellence, reflecting the prestige of the site location. Buildings must be designed to ensure protection of the amenity of surrounding buildings and public spaces, including privacy and overlooking.

Modulation of facades, sun shading and balconies, and clear articulation of building elements, textures and materials, should be employed to provide interest and variety to the streetscape.

Development must be contained by the Development Zone indicated at Figure 34. An articulation zone to the block boundary to the block boundary is permitted for the State Circle frontage. Articulation elements permitted in the articulation zone are awnings, shade devices, dwelling entries and roof elements. Balconies are not permitted forward of the primary building setbacks.

Legible entries are to be provided from Canberra Avenue and State Circle. Balconies off living areas should be a minimum dimension of 2.5 metres. Balcony balustrades should be solid to optimise privacy.

Rooftop plant and equipment, if required, should be carefully integrated with the roof form and design of the building and screened from public view from the street and Parliament House. Internal floor to ceiling dimensions should generally be a minimum of 2.7 metres to promote natural lighting and cross-ventilation, consistent with energy efficiency objectives and creation of generously scaled façades. Ground floor level must be equal to or greater than the existing adjacent kerb level.

Setbacks

Building setbacks should address the geometries of Canberra Avenue, Hobart Avenue and State Circle. This will result in a variable boundary setback to the State Circle frontage, and in this case setback to road geometry will be given precedence over the setback to the site boundary. Building setbacks from Canberra Avenue and State Circle and rear and side setbacks are indicated in Figure 34

Access

Vehicular access arrangements will be agreed by the relevant approval authorities, but will reflect the indicative vehicular and pedestrian access in Figure 34.

Vehicular access from Canberra Avenue should provide opportunity for landscape treatments commensurate with the primacy of the location. Access from Canberra Avenue should have minimal impact to the indicative verge planting pattern. The access layout should minimise traffic impact, with site planning to ensure vehicles are able to enter and leave the site in a forward direction.

A vehicular access point from Hobart Avenue should provide for main residential access to parking, visitor access to parking, as well as facilitating all waste and servicing vehicle access. Vehicular access from State Circle is not permitted.

The main pedestrian address frontages for development are to be oriented to Canberra Avenue and State Circle to reinforce the prestige and visual interest of the main avenues. Pedestrian access should connect with existing footpaths.

Car parking

Onsite parking must not be located within the Canberra Avenue and State Circle front landscape zones. All car parking other than parking for visitors, should be in a basement.

Traffic and parking assessments should accompany development proposals for the site, and this will be determined in consultation with the approving authority.

Secure parking entry/exit points should be located to take advantage of the natural fall of the site to avoid external ramps and to maximize the opportunity for ‘at grade’ entry into undercover parking zones under the building footprints.

Parking basements and ventilation openings are to be concealed from public view. Ventilation openings will be configured to minimise light spill and noise from the basements.

Basement car parking within the setback areas on Canberra Avenue and State Circle will only be permitted where it cannot be seen from Canberra Avenue and State Circle and where it does not affect the planting of trees and shrubs.

The visual impact of surface car parking must be minimised through adequate screening and landscape treatment that appropriately considers view lines and safety.

Undercroft parking, carports and free standing garages are not permitted.

Refer to ‘Design and Siting General Code’ for parking provision requirements.

Landscape

Landscaping should be consistent with Figure 34 and employ a formal character to Canberra Avenue and State Circle appropriate to the sites prestigious location.

The front and offsite landscape zones to Canberra Avenue and State Circle must be developed to provide a high quality landscape setting with space for planting shrubs and medium to large trees. The front and offsite landscape zones must be filled to ensure fall away from the ground level of buildings.

The Canberra Avenue verge will have inter-plantings of Eucalyptus mannifera and Prunus species consistent with nearby plantings along Canberra Avenue, and the indicative planting pattern shown in Figure 34. The State Circle verge will have Quercus species plantings consistent with verge trees along State Circle, and the indicative planting pattern shown in Figure 34.

Landscaping should soften built mass presented to Canberra Avenue and State Circle.

Wide building entrances marked with considered landscaping should be used to create formal and legible address frontages to Canberra Avenue and State Circle. These entrances should be integrated with existing footpaths.

A publicly accessible, high quality landscaping treatment, reflecting the indigenous landscape character of the land between State Circle and Capital Circle is to be provided at the corner of Canberra Avenue and State Circle to increase the amenity and visual quality for the site.

Letter box pillars, utility meters and minor service structures located in the landscape zone should be harmoniously integrated with the landscape design.

The rear landscape zone is to provide for a substantial landscape buffer that will afford privacy to rear neighbours and maintain winter sunlight to those properties.

Existing trees to the western boundary of Block 10 Section 13 Barton should be maintained where possible to ensure visual privacy between new development and the existing childcare centre. Additional planting to the rear of the site should be used to enhance privacy to the childcare centre without compromising solar gain.

Off-site works

Off-site landscape works, as indicated in Figure 34, consistent with landscaping for the subject site, may be required as part of the approval for development.

Figure 34 - Block 10 Section 13 Forrest - General design principlesFigure 34: Block 10 Section 13 Forrest - General design principles
Figure 35 - Block 10 Section 13 Forrest - Indicative edge cross sectionFigure 35: Block 10 Section 13 Forrest - Indicative edge cross sections


4.6 City Hill Precinct Code

4.6.1 Precinct Location

City Hill Precinct comprises the area radiating from City Hill and bounded by London Circuit. The precinct includes University Avenue, Ainslie Place and parts of Northbourne, Commonwealth and Constitution Avenues.

Figure 36 - City Hill Precinct locationFigure 36: City Hill Precinct location

4.6.2 Background

The City Centre has a multi-faceted role as Canberra’s most important metropolitan centre. The City Hill Precinct within the City Centre is located at the apex of the National Triangle in a location astride an important entrance route to the Parliamentary Zone, and forms a significant element in the physical structure of central Canberra.

City Hill Precinct is the municipal heart of central Canberra. The City Hill Precinct forms the Griffin’s symbolic and geographical centre for the City – a corner completing the National Triangle as a gateway to the Central National Area and a hub connecting significant main avenues and vistas.

There is a National Capital interest in ensuring that:

  • Sites within the City Hill Precinct are developed in accordance with their national importance, at the apex of the National Triangle.
  • The symbolic importance of the Main Avenues radiating from City Hill (Northbourne, Ainslie, Constitution, Commonwealth, Edinburgh and University Avenues) is protected and supported through the design and development of the adjacent blocks and the landscaping and design of the avenues

4.6.3 Objectives for City Hill Precinct

  1. Maintain and promote the City Centre as the main commercial centre of Canberra and the region – with the City Hill Precinct as the pre-eminent heart of City.
  2. The design of buildings and the amenity and environmental quality of the main public spaces should result in an accessible, attractive, high quality and distinctive centre, consistent with the City’s role as the major metropolitan centre and its location at one point of the National Triangle, the major organising element of the Central National Area.
  3. That the City Hill Precinct provides a vibrant, interesting and lively centre with high levels of human activity.
  4. Development must command the highest standards of urban design, sustainability, exemplary architecture and social inclusion, reflecting the character of the National Capital.
  5. The City Hill Precinct must complement and actively relate to, and integrate with, the existing and future structure of the rest of City.
  6. Encourage a mix of land uses, including residential uses, which contribute to a diverse and active character.
  7. Major buildings of municipal or cultural significance should be located adjacent to City Hill Park, with their main address to Vernon Circle

4.6.4 Land Use for City Hill Precinct

Land use for the City Hill Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 37.

Figure 37 - Land use for the City Hill PrecinctFigure 37: Land use for the City Hill Precinct

Permitted land uses for Land Use A are:

  • Administrative Use
  • Car Park
  • Café, Bar Restaurant
  • Casino
  • Community Protection Facility
  • Cultural Facility
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Education Establishment
  • Hotel
  • Health Centre
  • Motel
  • Indoor Recreation Facility
  • Office
  • Park
  • Personal Service Establishment
  • Place of Assembly
  • Public Utility
  • Residential
  • Retail
  • Scientific Research Establishment
  • Social/Community facility
  • Tourist facility.

Any buildings located within City Hill Precinct must be subsidiary to the permitted use as a park and must be designed, sited and of a scale that complements the landscape character

4.6.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

New or altered buildings must ensure that:

  • Sunlight access to open space within the City Hill Precinct and major pedestrian areas is maintained.
  • The vista to City Hill Park is framed and enhanced by new development.
  • Predominantly active frontages are provided at ground floor level for building elements fronting London Circuit and the Main Avenues that radiate from City Hill.

Subdivision patterns should be designed to minimise amalgamation of land and achieve a mix of development scales including fine urban grain.

New buildings are encouraged to be delivered through design competitions in order to encourage innovation and design excellence.

The symbolic importance of the City Hill Precinct should be reinforced in the design treatment of the streetscape and public places.

Public art and art spaces in new development should be encouraged.

Landscape and streetscape treatments are to be of a high quality emphasising the geometry and formality of the Main Avenues.

New development should exemplify sustainability principles and demonstrate excellence in urban design, landscape and architecture.

Figure 38 - City Hill - Indicative developmentFigure 38: City Hill – Indicative development

City Hill Park as a central open space

City Hill Park should be retained and enhanced as an enclosed central park serving a functional role within an urban built form.

The topography of City Hill Park may need to be modified to create an urban park, accommodate pedestrian desire lines and integrate with Vernon Circle.

City Hill Park is the primary public space for the Precinct. Any buildings located on City Hill Park must be ancillary to this purpose and be designed, sited and of a scale that complements the landscape character.

New public spaces created within the Precinct must complement and not diminish the pre-eminence of City Hill Park.

Figure 39 - City Hill - City Hill Park as a central open spaceFigure 39: City Hill – City Hill Park as a central open space

Building height

Building heights of up to 25 metres (generally six to eight storeys) above adjacent kerb levels of London Circuit, Vernon Circle and Northbourne, Edinburgh, Constitution and Commonwealth Avenues are permissible in all areas of City Hill Precinct.

Landmark buildings up to RL 617 (generally 14 to 18 storeys) will be restricted to the corners of the main avenues intersecting with London Circuit. See Figure 40.

Figure 40 - City Hill - Indicative Building Form, Height and Landmark BuildingsFigure 40: City Hill – Indicative building form, height and landmark buildings

Buildings more than 25 metres in height are to be the subject of wind testing, including down draught conditions and turbulence, to ensure development does not have adverse impacts on building entrances and the public domain.

Buildings fronting Vernon Circle should have a minimum height of 16 metres (equivalent to four storeys) to create a sense of enclosure around City Hill Park.

Minor building elements that extend building height above 25 metres will be considered where this enhances the architectural quality of the building and fosters energy efficiency, indoor amenity and appropriate urban scale.

Minimum floor-to-ceiling heights within buildings are to be as follows:

Location Min. floor height

Ground Floor facing Constitution Avenue and roads where ‘Indicative Active Frontages’ are located

6.5 metres floor to ceiling (mezzanine level permitted over 30% of ground floor)

Ground Floor (Residential)

3.3 metres floor-to-ceiling

Ground Floor (other uses, including commercial/office use)

3.6 metres floor-to-ceiling

Residential (general)

2.7metres floor-to-ceiling minimum for all habitable rooms, 2.4 metres is the preferred minimum for all non-habitable rooms however 2.25 metres is permitted.

For two-storey units, 2.4 metres minimum for second storey if 50 percent or more of the apartment has 2.7 metre minimum ceiling heights.

For two-storey units with a two-storey void space, 2.4 metre minimum ceiling heights.

Attic spaces are permitted, with a 1.5 metre minimum wall height at edge of room with a 30 degree minimum ceiling slope.

Active frontages

Street level frontages should, where possible, be active. Primary retail activities should be off London Circuit with secondary food and beverage activities occurring along north-south laneways so as to optimise sunlight access during peak periods.

Buildings on the avenues must have predominantly active frontages at ground floor.

Avenue connections and vistas

New road connections to Vernon Circle from Constitution and Edinburgh Avenues should facilitate access for local traffic and pedestrians.

View corridors must be retained from radiating avenues to City Hill Park. No buildings should bridge these avenues.

A limited palette of high-quality pedestrian pavement materials, street furniture and lighting will be used. Pavement and landscape design should have an elegant, simple and bold design emphasising the geometry and formality of the main avenues.

Figure 41 - City Hill - Indicative Avenue Connections and VistasFigure 41: City Hill – Indicative avenue connection and vistas

Heritage

The heritage values of the Sydney and Melbourne Buildings are to be considered and addressed by new buildings adjacent to these sites.

Traffic

Major modifications to the existing traffic management arrangements are dependent upon the continuing implementation of peripheral parkways and city bypass routes including Gungahlin Drive, Majura Parkway, Clunies Ross Street, Fairbairn Avenue, Marcus Clarke Street and Cooyong/Ballumbir Streets and the removal of the Parkes Way cloverleaves.

Traffic engineering devices (e.g. slip lanes) should be designed to promote pedestrian amenity, safety and access and bicycle movements.

Figure 42 - City Hill - Indicative road hierarchyFigure 42: City Hill – Indicative road hierarchy

Parking

Replacement of existing surface car parks and public car parking should be provided for as identified in the ACT Government Parking Strategy. Development of existing surface car parks will need to demonstrate that an adequate public car parking provision (on street or in appropriately designed structures) will meet the needs of City Hill Precinct.

Car parking for new development is to be accommodated in basements or in above ground structures that do not dominate the public domain.

Public transport

London Circuit should operate as the main public transport circuit for Canberra City.

Redevelopment of the City Hill Precinct should take place in the context of an integrated public transport plan. Mechanisms should be introduced to give priority to public transport.

Figure 43 - City Hill - Indicative Public TransportFigure 43: City Hill – Indicative public transport

Laneways

Existing laneways should be retained and new laneways created to provide permeability and create service access. Opportunities should be identified to create laneways with active frontages, particularly in relation to heritage and public buildings and at intersections.

Figure 44 - City Hill - Indicative LanewaysFigure 44: City Hill – Indicative laneways

Pedestrian and bicycle links

New development, including public spaces, will facilitate pedestrian connectivity and bicycle movements within the City Hill Precinct and between the City Hill Precinct and Canberra Central.

Figure 45 - City Hill - Indicative Pedestrian LinksFigure 45: City Hill –
Indicative
pedestrian
links
 
 
Figure 46 - City Hill - Indicative Street Cross Section (Constitution Avenue to City Hill Park)

Figure 46: City Hill – Indicative street cross section (Constitution Avenue to City Hill Park)

Figure 47 - City Hill - Indicative street cross sectionsFigure 47: City Hill – Indicative street cross sections


Location specific

Vernon Circle

Vernon Circle should serve as a ceremonial road leading to Parliament House and for public events for the city of Canberra. Any major redevelopment of the City Hill precinct should consider alternative options for traffic to allow easy pedestrian access to City Hill via Vernon Circle.

Over time, the existing major cultural and municipal buildings adjacent to City Hill Park (and extensions to them) could be reconfigured to address Vernon Circle.

Figure 48 - City Hill - Indicative Vernon CircleFigure 48: City Hill –
Indicative
Vernon
Circle
 
 
Figure 49 - Artists impression of Vernon Circle Figure 49: Artist’s impression of Vernon Circle

London Circuit

London Circuit should serve as a gateway, providing a transition between the boulevard character of the avenues and the urban scale of the inner City Hill Precinct. The transition should be achieved through the use of urban design and traffic engineering treatments that serve to physically and psychologically divert traffic from the avenues onto London Circuit, thereby limiting access to the inner City Hill Precinct to predominantly local traffic. London Circuit should operate as the main public transport circuit for Canberra Central.

Buildings must be set back from London Circuit a sufficient distance to establish a tree-lined boulevard character (two rows of trees and wide pavements).

New buildings fronting London Circuit must have active frontages.

Figure 50 - City Hill - Indicative development (an aerial perspective looking northwest towards the National Triangle)

 

 

Figure 50: City Hill – Indicative development (an aerial perspective looking northwest towards the National Triangle

 

Figure 51 - City Hill - An artists impression of City Hill Park looking towards the National Triangle

Figure 51: City Hill – An artist’s impression of City Hill Park looking towards the National Triangle


4.7 West Basin Precinct Code

4.7.1 Precinct location

The West Basin Precinct is bounded by London Circuit and Commonwealth Avenue to the east, Lake Burley Griffin to the south, the Australian National University to the west and Edinburgh Avenue to the north.

Figure 52 illustrates the location of the West Basin Precinct.

Figure 52 - West Basin Precinct locationFigure 52: West Basin Precinct location

4.7.2 Background

The West Basin precinct forms one of the key elements of the geometry and intent of the Griffin Plan at West Basin.

West Basin will be a vibrant cultural and entertainment precinct on a waterfront promenade. The area will create a new city neighbourhood, extending the city to the lake with a cosmopolitan mixture of shops, businesses, cafés, recreation, tourist activities and accommodation.

4.7.3 Objectives for West Basin Precinct

  1. Create a legible network of paths and streets by extending the city grid of streets and paths to enhance connectivity and accessibility to the lake.
  2. Create a vibrant public waterfront promenade in the Central National Area.
  3. Enhance the range of tourism and recreation experiences available on Lake Burley Griffin.
  4. Develop a built environment which demonstrates design excellence.
  5. Develop West Basin precinct with a mix of uses and create a public domain which demonstrates urban design excellence.
  6. Provide continuous public access around West Basin with links to the surrounding national attractions.
  7. Contribute to the visitor and recreation experience of the Lake Burley Griffin parklands with an active waterfront promenade that permits a high level of tourist, entertainment, accommodation and leisure uses.
  8. Enhance Commonwealth and Edinburgh Avenues as important physical, visual and symbolic links of Canberra.
  9. Reinforce Commonwealth Avenue, a significant approach route and vista to Parliament House, as a corridor of activity, leading pedestrians from the city into the Parliamentary Zone.
  10. Develop a significant public building, cultural attraction or landscape space on the water axis on the western shore of West Basin.
  11. Ensure new development meets leading practice for environmental sustainability including energy efficiency and water sensitive urban design measures.

4.7.4 Land Use for West Basin Precinct

Land use for the Acton Peninsula Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 53.

Figure 53 - Land use for the West Basin PrecinctFigure 53: Land use for the West Basin Precinct

Permitted land uses for ‘Land Use A’ are:

  • Bank and Cooperative Society
  • Café, Bar, Restaurant
  • Car Park
  • Club
  • Commercial Accommodation (Hotel, Motel or Serviced Apartment only)
  • Cultural Facility
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Indoor Recreation Facility
  • Office
  • Park
  • Personal Service Establishment
  • Place of Assembly
  • Public Utility
  • Residential
  • Retail
  • Road
  • Social/Community Facility
  • Tourist facility

Permitted land uses for ‘Land Use B’ are:

  • Bank and Cooperative Society
  • Café, Bar, Restaurant
  • Car Park
  • Club
  • Commercial Accommodation (Hotel, Motel or Serviced Apartment only)
  • Cultural Facility
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Indoor Recreation Facility
  • Office
  • Park
  • Personal Service Establishment
  • Place of Assembly
  • Public utility
  • Residential
  • Road
  • Social/Community Facility
  • Tourist Facility

Ancillary land uses permitted are:

  • Retail

Permitted land uses for ‘Land Use C’ are:

  • Aquatic Recreation Facility
  • Cultural Facility
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Place of Assembly
  • National Capital Use
  • Waterfront promenade

Ancillary land uses permitted are:

  • Car park
  • Hotel
  • Park
  • Public utility
  • Recreation
  • Tourist facility (not including a service station)

Permitted land uses for ‘Open Space’ are:

  • Aquatic Recreation Facility
  • Café, Bar, Restaurant
  • Car Park
  • Cultural Facility
  • Indoor Recreation Facility
  • Park
  • Pathway Corridor
  • Public utility
  • Recreation
  • Road
  • Tourist facility (not including a service station)

4.7.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

Urban Structure

Reinforce the Main Avenues framing the National Triangle as important symbolic connections and formal approaches to Parliament House (Commonwealth Avenue) and City Hill (Commonwealth and Edinburgh Avenues).

Extend the city grid of streets and paths from city to West Basin, maintaining the connectivity and accessibility of the urban block pattern.

Extend the city’s urban structure to the lake.

Figure 54: West Basin – Indicative urban structure
Figure 55 - West Basin - Indicative developmentFigure 55: West Basin – Indicative development
Figure 56 - West Basin - Indicative extension of the City to the LakeFigure 56: West Basin – Indicative extension of the city to the lake

Building Height and Form

Building height will generally be medium rise up to 25 metres.

Taller building elements may be considered on sites north of Parkes Way having regard to:

  • access to sunlight
  • visual and environmental amenity
  • microclimate

Building height on the waterfront promenade will be limited to 8 metres (maximum two storeys).

The parapet height of buildings fronting the promenade will be a maximum of 16 metres.

Taller building elements to a maximum of 25 metres, and not exceeding 30 per cent of the site area, may be considered.

Minimum floor-to-ceiling heights within buildings are to be as follows:

Location Min. floor height
Ground Floor facing Constitution Avenue and roads where ‘Indicative Active Frontages’ are located 6.5 metres floor to ceiling (mezzanine level permitted over 30% of ground floor)
Ground Floor (Residential) 3.3 metres floor-to-ceiling
Ground Floor (other uses, including commercial/office use) 3.6 metres floor-to-ceiling
Residential (general)

2.7metres floor-to-ceiling minimum for all habitable rooms, 2.4 metres is the preferred minimum for all non-habitable rooms however 2.25 metres is permitted.

For two-storey units, 2.4 metres minimum for second storey if 50 percent or more of the apartment has 2.7 metre minimum ceiling heights.

For two-storey units with a two-storey void space, 2.4 metre minimum ceiling heights.

Attic spaces are permitted, with a 1.5 metre minimum wall height at edge of room with a 30 degree minimum ceiling slope.

Development should generally be constructed to the street boundary to define and enclose streets and create continuous street frontage while allowing variations in individual buildings and uses.

Building forms, materials and finishes should be responsive to microclimate issues including solar access and wind. Use of sunscreen devices as articulation elements should be employed to achieve climate responsive façades.

Buildings above 25 metres in height are to be the subject of wind testing, including down draught conditions and turbulence, to ensure the development does not have adverse impacts on building entrances and the public domain.

Provide continuous climate protection to areas where retailing and service based developments form the predominant ground level use at the street.

Buildings should generally be modulated to clearly express the grid of the building. Tactility, silhouette and human scale in relation to built form should be achieved with the design of buildings.

Building design, layout and construction should take account of the impacts of noise on surrounding uses.

New buildings are encouraged to be delivered through design competitions in order to encourage innovation and design excellence.

Public art and art spaces in new development should be encouraged.

Land reclamation and land bridge

Replace the clover leaf intersection of Parkes Way and Commonwealth Avenue with a signalised grade-separated intersection.

Create a land bridge over a section of Parkes Way for streets to extend to the lake.

Reclaim land from the lake to establish a public waterfront promenade, reflecting the geometry of the 1918 Griffin Plan.

Figure 57 - West Basin - Indicative lake reclamation and land bridgeFigure 57: West Basin – Indicative lake reclamation and land bridge

Heritage

Provide public access to local heritage places around West Basin.

Create a public waterfront promenade reflecting the geometry and intent of the 1918 Griffin Plan.

Figure 58 - West Basin - HeritageFigure 58: West Basin – Heritage

Landscape/Streetscape

Landscape planting should reinforce the urban structure of West Basin and its integration with the setting of the Central National Area and the Lake Burley Griffin parklands.

A formal treatment should be applied to the main avenues, major streets and the waterfront promenade, and continuous street trees should define the pattern of city streets extending to the lake.

The visual impact of parking on the public domain should be minimized by integrating parking layouts with street tree plantings and pavement design.

A limited palette of high quality pedestrian pavement materials, street furniture and lighting should be used. Pavement and landscape design should have an elegant, simple and bold design emphasising the geometry and formality of the main avenues.

A range of soft and hard landscape treatments are to be incorporated into the waterfront promenade and foreshore.

Streetscapes must be well lit for pedestrians and made safe for night time use.

Footpath areas should be wide enough to cater for pedestrians and specific land use requirements and allow for seating areas, outdoor cafés, planting and urban art.

Public art should be included as an integral component of development proposals and the public domain.

Figure 59 - West Basin - Indicative landscape and streetscapeFigure 59: West Basin – Indicative landscape/streetscape

Waterfront Promenade

Maintain a continuous public pedestrian network with access to the foreshore with high quality pedestrian amenities including lighting, furniture, signage and landscape materials.

Provide well lit public areas and close-by on-street parking.

Link national attractions with a continuous pedestrian network.

Incorporate recreation and tourist activities along the waterfront promenade.

Provide for a shared pathway network along the waterfront promenade designed for all users.

Provide a minimum width of 55 metres for footpaths.

Figure 60 - West Basin - Indicative section waterfront promenadeFigure 60: West Basin – Indicative section waterfront promenade
Figure 61 - West Basin - indicative waterfront promenadeFigure 61: West Basin – Indicative waterfront promenade

Cycle ways and Ferry

Provide a network of cycle ways catering to recreation and commuter needs, separated spatially and by visual character where appropriate to prevent pedestrian conflicts.

Provide ferry landings at key nodes around West Basin which incorporate lake based recreation and tourist activities.

Figure 62 - West Basin - Indicative cycle ways and ferry routesFigure 62: West Basin – Indicative cycle ways and ferry routes

Active Frontage

Individual buildings will contribute to the definition of blocks and streets, with the greatest levels of public activity, shops and building entrances on main avenues, major streets and public spaces.

Identified active frontages are to present an attractive pedestrian-oriented frontage providing active uses and are to have a minimum of 80 percent active uses. All other streets are to have a minimum of 50 percent active frontages.

Residential uses should generally be avoided at street level.

Blank walls are strongly discouraged.

Pedestrian entries should be clearly visible from the public domain.

Figure 63 - West Basin - Indicative active frontagesFigure 63: West Basin – Indicative active frontages

Road Hierarchy

Maximise connections into the site from surrounding main avenues.

Provide a hierarchy of streets being main avenues, major streets and minor streets.

Provide a flexible road network that can accommodate temporary closures of minor streets to vehicles for significant pedestrian events.

Ensure that minor streets are low-speed urban streets which give priority to pedestrians.

Design traffic engineering devices to promote pedestrian amenity, safety and access.

Figure 64 - West Basin - Indicative section along Marcus Clarke Street extensionFigure 64: West Basin – Indicative section along Marcus Clarke Street extension
Figure 65 - West Basin - Indicative street cross sectionsFigure 65: West Basin – Indicative street cross sections
Figure 66 - West Basin - Indicative road hierarchyFigure 66: West Basin – Indicative road hierarchy
Figure 67 - West Basin - An artists impression of extending the City to the LakeFigure 67: West Basin – An artist’s impression of extending the City to the Lake


4.8 Constitution Avenue And Anzac Parade Precinct Code


4.8.1 Precinct location

The Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct comprises the land between Constitution Avenue and Parkes Way, the Russell apex of the National Triangle, Anzac Parade and the Australian War Memorial, and various sites to the north of Constitution Avenue.

Figure 68 illustrates the location of the Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct.

Figure 68 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct locationFigure 68: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct location

4.8.2 Background

A key element of Griffins’ formally adopted plan for Canberra is the central triangle formed by grand avenues. Constitution Avenue is the base of this geometric element (the National Triangle) and was the Municipal Axis of the Griffins’ plan.

Constitution Avenue is central to the implementation of the Griffin Legacy. Constitution Avenue will become an elegant and vibrant mixed use grand boulevard linking London Circuit to Russell, increasing the vitality of the Central National Area and completing the National Triangle. This will be supported by an integrated transport system, broad tree-lined footpaths and outdoor dining and street parking.

Anzac Parade is set along the Land Axis, which forms a key feature of the Griffins’ original 1912 plan of the city. The Australian War Memorial stands at the top end of Anzac Parade. The two together are central to the commemoration of Australian military service and sacrifice.

There is a national capital interest in ensuring that:

  • sites on Constitution Avenue are developed in accordance with their national significance, as part of Griffin’s National Triangle
  • the symbolic importance of the Constitution Avenue as a Main Avenue and the base of the National Triangle is protected and supported through the design and development of the adjacent blocks and the landscaping and design of the avenue
  • fitting sites on Anzac Parade are available for commemoration and remembrance
  • balanced building massing at the sites at the southern end of Anzac Parade is maintained as far as practicable and is reinstated as a result of any redevelopment of those sites, to ensure the portal function on the Anzac Parade frontages of those sites is maintained for the benefit of the Parliament House Vista.

4.8.3 Objectives for Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade

  1. Establish Constitution Avenue as a diverse and active grand boulevard lined with shops, cafés and a mix of commercial, entertainment and residential uses.
  2. Establish Constitution Avenue as a prestigious address for National Capital Uses.
  3. Link education and high-tech employment clusters located in the corridor between the Australian National University and the Canberra International Airport.
  4. Complete the base of the National Triangle.
  5. Support Constitution Avenue with an integrated transport system and mix of land uses contributing to the life of the National Triangle.
  6. Establish Constitution Avenue with higher density development, public transport, broad tree-lined footpaths and outdoor dining and street parking.
  7. Develop a built environment which demonstrates design excellence.
  8. Achieve leading practice environmentally sustainable development.

4.8.4 Land use for Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct

Land use for the Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 69.

Figure 69 - Land use for the Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade PrecinctFigure 69: Land use for the Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade Precinct

Permitted land uses for ‘Land Use A’ are:

  • Administrative Use
  • Aquatic recreation facility
  • Bank and cooperative society
  • Café, bar, restaurant
  • Car park
  • Club
  • Commercial Accommodation (Serviced Apartment only)
  • Consulting Rooms
  • Cultural facility
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Education establishment
  • Health Centre
  • Hotel
  • Indoor recreation facility
  • Motel
  • Office
  • Park
  • Personal service establishment
  • Place of assembly
  • Public utility
  • Residential
  • Retail (ground floor of buildings only)
  • Road
  • Social/Community facility
  • Tourist facility

Ancillary land uses for ‘Land Use A’ are:

  • Child Care Centre
  • Retail (either ground floor or above)

Permitted land uses for ‘Open Space’ are:

  • Café, bar, restaurant
  • Car park
  • Child care centre
  • Cultural facility
  • Indoor recreation facility
  • Park
  • Pathway corridor
  • Public utility
  • Recreation
  • Road
  • Tourist facility (not including a service station)

For ‘National Capital Use’ sites, ancillary land uses permitted are:

  • Bank
  • Café, bar, restaurant
  • Car Park
  • Child care centre
  • Club
  • Consulting rooms
  • Cooperative society
  • Diplomatic Mission
  • Health centre
  • Indoor recreation facility
  • Personal services establishment
  • Public utility
  • Retail
  • Social/community facility

4.8.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

  1. Built form and landscape design should respond to the primacy of the geometry of Constitution Avenue and the Russell apex of the National Triangle with building form emphasising the alignments of Constitution Avenue, Kings Avenue and Parkes Way.
  2. Reinforce the city’s three-dimensional structure based on its topography and the landscape containment of the Inner Hills.
  3. Develop Constitution Avenue (generally east of Anzac Parade) as a prestigious setting for national capital uses, related employment and amenities.
  4. Reduce the barrier created by Parkes Way and its high speed intersections along its length by changing the character of Parkes Way to become a boulevard addressed with prestigious buildings, at grade pedestrian crossings and appropriately scaled road reserves and intersections.
  5. Provide a mix of land uses that contributes to the creation of a 24 hour community with dynamic activity patterns including retail, restaurants, residential and hotels close to public transport, employment areas, cultural attractions and the parklands of Lake Burley Griffin.
  6. Integrate public transport priority in the design of Constitution Avenue including provision for future light rail.
  7. Development should include a high level of access to a diversity of uses and activities, have cohesion and diversity in design character and detail, and be able to respond to changes over time.
  8. Provide a transition in building scale and use to protect the amenity of adjoining residential areas.
  9. Ensure conveniently located parking in a manner that does not dominate the public domain. All basement and service vehicle entries are to be located from secondary street frontages.
  10. Create an open and legible network of paths and streets that extends and connects City Hill and the adjoining suburbs of Reid and Campbell to Constitution Avenue, Kings and Commonwealth Parks and Lake Burley Griffin.
  11. Create a public domain that forms a linked sequence of spaces that are accessible, safe, comfortable, and pedestrian-scaled, that promotes walking and use of public transport and minimises reliance on cars.
  12. Integrate perimeter security, if required, with streetscape elements that enhance the public domain.
  13. Architectural character should develop a contemporary palette of styles and materials, reflecting the varied land uses and providing activity and interest, particularly at street level. Particular attention should be paid to building form and roof profiles in areas of high visibility.
  14. Design proposals should be site responsive, taking maximum advantage of varying characteristics and features of each site, complementing adjoining development – both existing and proposed – and expressing physical and environmental features.
  15. The street network, building form and facilities should be inherently flexible to accommodate changing uses and demands across the site and within buildings over time.
  16. Development should command high standards of urban design, sustainability, architecture and social inclusion reflecting the character of the national capital and providing a model for city development in Australia in the 21st century.
Urban structure

Reinforce Constitution Avenue as the base of the National Triangle and the Russell apex with appropriate urban form.

Create a street grid, sympathetic to Griffin’s intended pattern of streets and city blocks that provides a high level of integration with the street and path network of City, Reid and Campbell and link these areas with Lake Burley Griffin and Kings and Commonwealth Parks.

Figure 70 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative urban structureFigure 70: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative urban structure (1)
Figure 71 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative urban structure (2)Figure 71: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative urban structure (2)
Figure 72 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative main pedestrian connectionsFigure 72: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative main pedestrian connections

Landscape structure

Landscape planting should reinforce the urban structure of Constitution Avenue and its integration with the setting of the Central National Area and the Lake Burley Griffin parklands.

A formal treatment should be applied to the main avenues including Constitution, Kings and Commonwealth Avenues, as well as Parkes Way. Continuous street trees should define the pattern of major and minor streets.

The visual impact of parking on the public domain should be minimised by integrating parking layouts with street tree plantings and pavement design.

Figure 73 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Landscape structureFigure 73: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Landscape structure
Figure 74 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative landscape structureFigure 74: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative landscape structure

Public transport, access and circulation

Allow for an integrated public transport system with Constitution, Kings and Commonwealth Avenues and London Circuit as the principal public transport route.

Provide a hierarchy of pedestrian routes ranging from Constitution, Commonwealth and Kings Avenues and London Circuit as urban boulevards, major streets (including Coranderrk Street and Blamey Crescent and Sellheim Avenue), minor streets, laneways and arcades.

Ensure safety and comfort for pedestrians, with intersections designed to minimise slip lanes for fast turning traffic.

Provide on-street parking on all streets where practicable.

Access to the western portion of Block 7 Section 3 Parkes from Block 6 Section 3 Parkes must be maintained to allow access to Commonwealth Park via underpass from the northern side of Parkes Way.

Figure 75: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative public transport, access and circulation

Road hierarchy

The road hierarchy provides a legible and connective framework for moving throughout the area with:

  • Constitution, Commonwealth and Kings Avenues and Parkes Way having the role of principal routes for through traffic and pedestrians connecting other parts of the city to the area
  • major connecting streets including Coranderrk Street, Blamey Crescent and Sellheim Avenue having a role of providing the main connections from the City Centre and adjoining neighbourhoods
  • minor streets having a local access role with priority for pedestrians and cyclists
  • lanes, shareways and arcades having a service, access and pedestrian network role.

Figure 76 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative road structureFigure 76: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative road structure

Cycle ways

Provide an attractive and direct network for pedestrians and cyclists catering to recreation and commuter needs, separated spatially and by visual character where appropriate to prevent pedestrian conflicts.

Figure 77 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative cyclewaysFigure 77: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative cycle ways

Streetscape design

Provide a complementary hierarchy of streetscape elements that relates to the road hierarchy giving primacy to the main avenues, emphasising continuity along their length through avenues of appropriately scaled street trees, consistent pedestrian pavement materials, street furniture and lighting.

Development should generally be constructed to the street boundary to define and enclose streets and create continuous street frontage while allowing variations in individual buildings and uses.

Use a limited palette of high quality pedestrian pavement materials, street furniture and lighting. Pavement and landscape design should have an elegant, simple and bold design emphasising the geometry and formality of the main avenues.

Ensure streetscapes are well lit for pedestrians and optimise security and safety for night time use. Footpath areas should be wide enough to cater for pedestrians and specific land use requirements and allow for seating areas, outdoor cafés, planting and urban art.

Wider pavements for outdoor cafés and public amenity are to be located on the sunny southern side of the avenue.

Figure 78 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative streetscape design

Figure 78: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative streetscape design

Figure 79 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative typical cross section Parkes Way between Commonwealth and Kings AvenueFigure 79: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative typical cross section Parkes Way between Commonwealth and Kings Avenue


Active frontages

Individual buildings will contribute to the definition of blocks and streets, with the greatest levels of public activity, shops and building entrances on main avenues, streets and public spaces.

Blank façades to public spaces and streets are to be avoided.

Active streets should be a priority along Constitution Avenue and other streets throughout the area, with new development generally incorporating active ground level frontages to enliven public streets and spaces and provide passive surveillance.

Ground level frontages will present an attractive pedestrian-oriented frontage providing active uses for a minimum of 30 percent of the street frontage. Key active frontages are to have a minimum of 75 percent active uses.

Residential uses, except for home offices, should be avoided at street level at those locations identified as having an active frontage in Figure 80.

Blank walls are discouraged. Pedestrian entries should be clearly visible from the public domain.

Figure 80 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative active frontagesFigure 80: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative active frontage

Building height and form

Provide climate protection to areas where retailing and service based developments form the predominant ground level use at the street.

Buildings above 25 metres in height are to be the subject of wind testing, including down draught conditions and turbulence, to ensure the development does not have adverse impacts on building entrances and the public domain.

Buildings heights will generally be medium rise up to 25 metres above adjacent kerb levels to retain the landscape backdrop of the inner hills of Central Canberra.

Buildings to a maximum height of RL600 are permitted in the locations identified in Figure 81. Buildings to RL600 are contingent on meeting applicable heritage requirements. To ensure that a balanced building massing and portal effect is maintained at the southern end of Anzac Parade, buildings on the second site to be developed must be equal in height to those of the first site to be redeveloped. This is applicable only to buildings in the area subject to the maximum RL600 height limit.

buildings in the area subject to the maximum RL600 height limit on

A landmark building to RL 617 adjacent to Commonwealth Avenue will be subject to consultation.

Minor building elements that extend building heights above 25 metres will be considered where this enhances the architectural quality of the building, and fosters energy efficiency, indoor amenity and appropriate urban scale.

Building height should transition down in scale to a maximum of 3 storeys (generally 12 metres above natural ground level) to be sympathetic to scale of adjoining suburbs of Reid and Campbell.

Figure 81 - Constitution Avenue Indicative building height and formFigure 81: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative building height and form

Development should generally be constructed to the street boundary to define and enclose streets and create continuous street frontage while allowing variations in individual buildings and uses. Development on the northern side of Constitution Avenue will be set back a minimum of 6.5 metres from the block boundary.

Where buildings are required to be set back to achieve security stand-off distances, continuity of the building line should be reflected in the design of passive security measures (for example, building plinth walls on the street boundary).

Where fronting residential streets in Campbell and Reid, building setbacks should generally complement existing building setbacks.

Building forms, materials and finishes should be responsive to microclimate issues including solar access and wind. Use of sunscreen devices as articulation elements should be employed to achieve climate responsive façades.

Buildings should generally be modulated to clearly express the grid of the building. Tactility, silhouette and human scale in relation to built form should be achieved with the design of buildings.

New buildings are encouraged to be delivered through design competitions in order to encourage innovation and design excellence.

Building design, layout and construction should take account of the impacts of noise on surrounding uses.

Building height is to be measured from and between the finish footpath level at each corner of a development block.

Figure 82 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Measurement of building height
Figure 82: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Measurement of building height

Minimum floor-to-ceiling heights within buildings are to be as follows:

Location

Min. floor height

Ground Floor facing Constitution Avenue and roads where ‘Indicative Active Frontages’ are located

6.5 metres floor to ceiling (mezzanine level permitted over 30% of ground floor)

Ground Floor (Residential)

3.3 metres floor-to-ceiling

Ground Floor (other uses, including commercial/office use)

3.6 metres floor-to-ceiling

Residential (general)

2.7metres floor-to-ceiling minimum for all habitable rooms, 2.4 metres is the preferred minimum for all non-habitable rooms however 2.25 metres is permitted.

For two-storey units, 2.4 metres minimum for second storey if 50 percent or more of the apartment has 2.7 metre minimum ceiling heights.

For two-storey units with a two-storey void space, 2.4 metre minimum ceiling heights.

Attic spaces are permitted, with a 1.5 metre minimum wall height at edge of room with a 30 degree minimum ceiling slope.

Water sensitive urban design

Implement water sensitive urban design strategies, including bio-filtration systems integrated with street and landscape design, to protect lake water quality.

To protect the water quality of Lake Burley Griffin, a catchment management approach should be implemented to detain and filter stormwater in the upper catchment or at the source.

Figure 83 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative stormwatFigure 83: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative stormwater (proposed)

Parking

Provide on-street car parking and conveniently-located bicycle parking to support retail uses, pedestrian amenity and after-hours activity.

Large off-street permanent surface car parks are to be avoided; car parking is to be accommodated in basements or in above-ground structures concealed from public areas by habitable building façades.

Development of existing surface car parks will need to demonstrate that an adequate public car parking provision (on-street or in appropriately designed structures) will meet the needs of Constitution Avenue.

Car parking for new development should accord with the following rates:

Land use(s)

Car parking rate

Locational requirements

Residential

One space per dwelling and one visitor space per four dwellings or part thereof.

Long-stay resident parking: on-site

Short stay/visitor parking: on-site or off-site immediately adjacent to the site.

Office

One space per 100 square metres of gross floor area.

On-site or off-site immediately adjacent to the site.

Administrative use; Bank; Child Care Centre; Consulting Rooms; Cooperative Society; Health Centre; Personal Services Establishment

Two spaces per 100 square metres of gross floor area.

On-site or off-site immediately adjacent to the site, with the exception of Child Care Centre where parking must be provided on-site.

Bar, Café, Restaurant, Retail

Two and a half spaces per 100 square metres of gross floor area.

On-site or off-site immediately adjacent to the site.

Hotel, Motel

One space per employee, plus one space per guest room or unit for establishments up to 36 units; or

25 spaces plus 0.3 spaces per guest room for establishments of more than 36 units.

On-site.

Land uses for which car parking rates are not prescribed above will be subject to individual assessment.

Proponents must demonstrate the access and parking capacity of the proposed development, and its impacts on the transport network and surrounding area. A higher on-site and/or off-site parking provision for any use may be required by the National Capital Authority after taking into account the relationship between on-site parking, off-site parking opportunities, the capacity of public transport in the area at the time of development, and anticipated future levels of public transport.

Additional parking will be provided for bicycles, motorcycles and vehicles owned and operated under car-sharing schemes.

Integrated urban art and signage

Public art and art spaces in new development should be encouraged.

Public art should be included as an integral component of development proposals and the public domain. There must be a high level of integration between advertising and signage, which contributes to the character of the place.

Opportunities for animated signs to create focal points when viewed from across public spaces may be considered where this does not impact adversely on the overall character of the place.

Figure 84 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - Indicative developmentFigure 84: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – Indicative development
Figure 85 - Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade - An artists impression of Constitution AvenueFigure 85: Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade – An artist’s impression of Constitution Avenue

Location specific

Section 5 Campbell

The following conditions apply to the area bounded by the eastern edge of Anzac Parade, Constitution Avenue, and Creswell, Chowne and Page Streets.

All residential and commercial development proposed for Section 5 Campbell is subject to public notification and consultation.

Where an inconsistency arises between these detailed conditions and the general conditions of the Precinct Code, these detailed conditions prevail.

Figure 86 - Section 5 Campbell - Illustrative development planFigure 86: Section 5 Campbell – Illustrative development plan

Public space

The overall structure of public space is to respond to the established network of streets, parks and public spaces, and enhance the connectivity, accessibility and legibility of this network. At a finer scale, public spaces are to respond to site topography through designs that resolve access and drainage.

The design of public space is to provide increased amenity for residents within and adjacent to the site, through improvements to passive surveillance and visual permeability.

The general arrangement of streets and sections is shown in Figure 87.

Figure 87 - Section 5 Campbell - Public spaceFigure 87: Section 5 Campbell – Public Space

Building form

Building forms are to respond to the scale and pattern of development on Constitution Avenue, the proposed network of public space and achieve a transition that responds to the established residential urban form.

Building designs are to provide controlled solar gain and cross-ventilation, to reduce energy consumption and improve the amenity for building occupants. The maximum permissible building depths for residential buildings as measured across the floorplate are shown in Figure 88. Minor departures are permitted where it can be demonstrated that optimum solar gain and cross ventilation is achieved and where it can be demonstrated to improve the public domain.

Amalgamation of sections will not be permitted where building forms adversely impact pedestrian movement or visual access. Building elements (other than awnings) are not to be built over roads.

Figure 88 - Section 5 Campbell - Built form envelopesFigure 88: Section 5 Campbell – Built form envelopes

Site access and set-backs

Primary vehicle access to Section 5 Campbell is to be from Constitution Avenue, with the exception of basement car parks. Service entries must not face Constitution Avenue, Anzac Park East and new roads bordering Open Space. All service entries are to be located and designed to minimise their impact on the streetscape. Access to service rooms and areas should be achieved within buildings to minimise adverse impacts on public space.

Pedestrian access to each building is to be provided at adjacent ground level, whilst maintaining privacy for private residences and passive surveillance.

Direct pedestrian access from the public domain is to be provided to each ground floor unit or tenancy where they have a clear relationship to the public domain. The level of ground floor entries should not be less than the finished level of the footpath and not more than 450mm above the footpath level.

The required building setbacks are shown in Figure 89. Balconies and other articulation elements may encroach into the setback zone. Any such encroachments must not exceed 30% of the setback area and are not permissible on the ground floor. Encroachments within the setback area must not include internal habitable space.

Figure 89 - Section 5 Campbell - Primary building line setbacks from boundaryFigure 89: Section 5 Campbell – Primary building line setbacks from boundary

Building height 

Overall building heights are to comply with those shown in Figure 90. Minor departures from heights shown in Figure 90 will only be considered where it can be demonstrated that the mass and bulk of buildings is not significantly increased, and where it enhances the architectural quality of the building, and fosters energy efficiency, indoor amenity, appropriate urban scale, and adds visual interest to the skyline. Building design is to take advantage of natural light and orientation for occupants and visitors. 

Figure 90 - Section 5 Campbell - Permitted Building height

Figure 90: Section 5 Campbell - Building height


Building façades

Street corners are to be expressed by giving visual prominence to parts of the building façade such as a change in articulation, material or colour, roof expression and/or increased height.

Building articulation, material and colour must be sympathetic to the heritage values of the adjacent National and Commonwealth Heritage listed places. Building entries are to be clearly identified through building form, material and colour.

The use of built form elements such as balconies, projections, awnings and hoods are encouraged to provide shelter and ameliorate wind and downdraft in public spaces.

Parking

A minimum of 150 on-street visitor parking spaces should be provided above ground.

Ground level or above ground parking structures are not permitted.

Materials

Materials should be selected for their permanence and durability. Materials should not be highly reflective, to avoid glare and focused transfer of heat. Materials should have potential for recycling.

Landscape

Trees planted within the road reserve should be consistent with the existing landscape character of Campbell and provide continuous canopy to shade roads and footpaths in summer. Trees planted within road reserves must be capable of achieving the heights and canopy spread indicated in Figure 94, Figure 95, Figure 96, Figure 97, Figure 98 and Figure 99 at maturity.

The landscape zone within blocks is consolidated to provide for substantial mature plantings that will afford privacy to neighbours and maintain winter sunlight to properties where available. Landscape plantings within each block must include a selection of large scale trees, capable of reaching a minimum 15 metres in height with a broad canopy and that are consistent with the landscape character of Campbell when mature. Deep soil space to be provided is shown in Figure 91.

Figure 91 - Section 5 Campbell - Preferred sites for deep soil landscape conditionsFigure 91: Section 5 Campbell – Preferred sites for deep soil landscape locations

Heritage

Development of Section 5 Campbell will respect the cultural heritage values of the National and Commonwealth Heritage listed places in the vicinity of the site.

Anzac Park East

Off-site landscaping is required to assist in reducing the visibility of building form from Anzac Parade, and in providing a green backdrop to memorials.

Existing Arbutus unedo in the southern verge of Anzac Park East will be retained to provide a dense evergreen screen. Trees may be removed to allow construction of new streets. Existing Arbutus unedo are to be interplanted with Eucalyptus cinerea to add a second canopy layer.

Where gaps exist in the rows of Eucalyptus bicostata on Anzac Parade, new plantings are required to match the plantings on the western side of Anzac Parade.

The landscape treatment at the corner of Constitution Avenue and Anzac Parade/Anzac Parade East should generally be in accordance with Figure 92.

Works Approval will not be granted for residential and commercial development on Section 5 Campbell until such time as off-site landscape works on Anzac Park East and Anzac Parade have been completed.

Section 5

Particular attention should be given to the building form/façade at the corner of Anzac Parade East and Constitution Avenue. The design of buildings should be articulated using a variety of messing; solids and voids; and materials and colours to ameliorate any impacts on the adjacent National and Commonwealth Heritage listed places.

Buildings should not intrude on the public appreciation of the eastern handle of the New Zealand Memorial as the gateway to the Memorial Parade or interrupt the symmetrical characteristics of the East and West portal buildings in framing the Parliament House Vista.

The architectural design of the buildings on Site C must be sympathetic to the heritage values of the adjacent National and Commonwealth Heritage listed places.

Figure 92 - Section 5 Campbell - landscape treatment at corner of Constitution Avenue and Anzac Park EastFigure 92: Section 5 Campbell – Landscape treatment at corner of Constitution Avenue and Anzac Park East

Lighting

The impact of outdoor lighting in proximity to Anzac Parade and the memorials should be minimised.

Heritage Management Plans for National and Commonwealth Heritage listed places should be considered in developing external lighting designs. The colour and finish of light poles and other light fittings should be sympathetic to the heritage values of the adjacent National and Commonwealth Heritage listed places.

New building façade lighting installations should use full cutoff light fittings that are carefully integrated into the building’s structure. External lighting to building entrances, window displays and signage should be restricted to assist in providing a dramatic backdrop. Consideration will be given to building lighting where it contributes to identity, legibility, silhouette, architectural expression, and façade articulation.

All street and footpath lighting is to be full cutoff.

Indicative development – Streetscape

The following indicative development streetscape sections are provided to illustrate the proposed relationship between public space, landscape and transport uses (see legend provided at Figure 93 for locations):

  • Wendouree Drive
  • Park Edge Street (Getting extension)
  • Park Edge Street (Chowne Street Alignment)
  • Shared-way (Chowne Street Alignment)
  • Streets adjoining Anzac Park East
  • Anzac Park East

Figure 93 - Section 5 Campbell - Indicative streetscape development location planFigure 93: Section 5 Campbell – Indicative streetscape development location plan
Figure 94 - Section 5 Campbell - (Wendouree Drive)Figure 94: Section 5 Campbell – Wendouree Drive
Figure 95 - Section 5 Campbell - Park edge street (Getting extension)Figure 95: Section 5 Campbell – Park edge street (Getting extension)
Figure 96 - Section 5 Campbell - Park edge street (Chowne Street alignment)Figure 96: Section 5 Campbell – Park edge street (Chowne Street alignment)
Figure 97 - Section 5 Campbell - Shared way (Chowne Street alignment)Figure 97: Section 5 Campbell – Shared Way (Chowne Street alignment)
Figure 98 - Section 5 Campbell - Memorial streetsFigure 98: Section 5 Campbell – Memorial streets
Figure 99 - Section 5 Campbell - Anzac Park EastFigure 99: Section 5 Campbell –Anzac Park East

Anzac Park East and West

Detailed conditions of planning, design and development must be agreed by the National Capital Authority prior to development of the land. The detailed conditions must address (at a minimum) the following:

  • building facades, including articulation, materials and colour
  • access and circulation
  • building form
  • landscape structure and open space
  • lighting.

Detailed conditions of planning, design and development for the sites must not be inconsistent with heritage values.


4.9 Australian Defence Force Academy, Royal Military College Duntroon, And Campbell Park Precinct Code

4.9.1 Precinct location

The Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA), Royal Military College Duntroon (RMC), and Campbell Park Precinct encompasses the two military training facilities of ADFA and RMC, the military residential area of Academy Close, and Department of Defence offices at Campbell Park.

The provisions of the Precinct Code relate primarily to ADFA and RMC. A number of the figures within this Precinct Code do not include Academy Close and Campbell Park as they do not form part of the military training institutions. Site specific provisions are included for these areas.

The ADFA, RMC, and Campbell Park Precinct comprises the two military training facilities of ADFA and RMC, which together occupy a total area of around 231 hectares approximately 3.5 kilometres south-east of the Canberra city centre. Campbell Park offices are located to the north of the two military training facilities, separated by open space forming part of the Inner Hills.

ADFA and RMC are surrounded by Mount Pleasant to the north-east and separated from the suburbs of Campbell and the Russell offices to the west by a bushland ridge which forms a physical barrier. To the north-east is open land used for grazing. Canberra Airport is located to the east and the Molonglo River and Jerrabomberra Wetlands are located to the south of the site.

Figure 100 illustrates the location of the ADFA, RMC, and Campbell Park Precinct.

Figure 100 - Australian Defence Force Academy and Royal Military College Duntroon Precinct locationFigure 100: Australian Defence Force Academy, Royal Military College Duntroon, and Campbell Park Precinct location

4.9.2 Background

The foundation of the RMC in Canberra was initiated concurrently with the competition for the design of Canberra in 1911. The Griffin plan identifies the site for a ‘Military Post’ at the eastern end of the municipal axis and in a later version, identifies the Military College on its present site.

The pastoral property of Duntroon was acquired by the Australian Government in 1912 and cadets from the college played a prominent role in the life of the new city.

RMC provides military training for all potential Army General Service Officers (GSO). RMC also undertakes the military component of training for army cadets at ADFA.

The landscape character of the site varies according to topography and land use. The upper slopes have a native woodland character, linking the site to the Inner Hills. The dominant landscape character of the mid-slopes consists of mixed exotic species, including some eucalypts, with an understorey of hedges and screen shrubs. An open landscape character dominates the flat areas, where large canopy trees define spaces for playing fields and closed training areas.

The current ADFA campus was designed and planned in the early 1980s, as the primary tertiary institution for the Australian Defence Force and was officially opened on 11 December 1986.

4.9.3 Objectives for Australian Defence Force Academy, Royal Military College Duntroon, and Campbell Park Precinct

The vision for RMC and ADFA is that they will continue to provide premier academic and military facilities and meet the academic and military training needs for the Australian Defence Force for the foreseeable future.

Both Institutions represent a vital element of Canberra’s role as the National Capital. RMC is the only Army officer training facility in Australia, and, given its historical significance, sense of tradition and heritage character, is an important representation of Army presence in the national capital. ADFA is the centre for tertiary education for the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and educates approximately 30% of all Officer cadets within the tri-services of the ADF.

Objectives in achieving the vision are:

  • To encourage shared use facilities, located centrally to both ADFA and RMC
  • To achieve greater efficiency and increased flexibility in buildings and infrastructure to reflect changing uses
  • To consolidate housing within existing residential areas
  • To maintain and enhance sporting and recreational facilities to meet ADFA and RMC needs
  • To conserve and manage significant natural, cultural and Indigenous heritage values.

The site is located within the Central National Area and a high quality of planning and development should be achieved within a design context appropriate to its location.

Planning for RMC and ADFA is to be based on an integrated and sustainable approach to future use and development of both sites. Improved integration between the two sites and greater opportunities for shared use of facilities are expected outcomes.

The Master Plan is to facilitate upgrading domestic, academic and recreational facilities to ensure that they meet contemporary military and academic training needs and comply with current access, health and safety standards.

The urban design values of RMC and ADFA are to be recognised, protected and enhanced as an integral component of future development. In particular, the urban composition that incorporates the Headquarters Building, Morshead Drive and the Fairbairn Avenue Entry (the ‘Gun Gates’) is to be recognised for its significance to the urban character of RMC.

Development is intended to occur in a manner consistent with the principles of water sensitive urban design incorporating integration of stormwater treatment into the landscape, protection of water quality (particularly in relation to the Molonglo River and its tributaries), and reduction of run-off and peak flows.

4.9.4 Constraints

The Constraints Map (Figure 101) provides a context for the Master Plan and describes the primary planning issues to be considered with respect to development of the site. Significant constraints are illustrated on the Constraints Map and are described below.

Environmental constraints

Several areas of vegetation and potential fauna habitats listed under Australian Government environment legislation occur on site. These include:

  • White Box – Yellow Box – Blakely’s Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland (including Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor (Hoary Sunray)
  • Natural temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory (including habitat for several threatened fauna species).

Heritage

The RMC Duntroon Conservation Area is listed on the Commonwealth Heritage List. Individual buildings or locations within the RMC Duntroon Conservation Area are also listed individually on the Commonwealth Heritage List. These include Duntroon House and Garden, Changi Chapel and the ANZAC Chapel of St Paul, Parade Ground and Associated Buildings Group, and individual residences and sheds.

Airport generated constraints

The northern portion of ADFA is affected by constraints generated by its proximity to Canberra International Airport, including:

  • Areas of high aircraft generated noise (High Noise Corridor) – residential development and other noise sensitive land uses would be restricted in this area
  • The Airport Obstacle Limitation Surface (AOLS) – height limitations apply to all forms of development within areas affected by this constraint.

Figure 101 - Australian Defence Force Academy and Constraints PlanFigure 101: Australian Defence Force Academy and Royal Military College Duntroon – Constraints Plan

4.9.5 Land Use For Australian Defence Force Academy, Royal Military College Duntroon, And Campbell Park Precinct

Land use for the Australian Defence Force Academy, Royal Military College Duntroon, and Campbell Park Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 102.

Figure 102 - Land use for the Australian Defence Force Academy and Royal Military College DuntroonFigure 102: Land use for the Australian Defence Force Academy, Royal Military College Duntroon, and Campbell Park Precinct

ADFA and Duntroon are further divided into ‘zones’ that correspond with the primary purposes within the overall function of the facility as a military training and academic institutions (refer Figure 103. Likely land uses which are permissible within each zone are listed in Table 1.

Campbell Park Offices and Academy Close

The range and nature of uses permitted at Campbell Park Offices is:

  • Defence Installation
  • Office (up to a maximum of 55,000 m2 gross floor area).

The range and nature of uses permitted on land at Academy Close is Residential.

Figure 103 - Australian Defence Force Academy and RMC Zone mapFigure 103: Australian Defence Force Academy and Royal Military College Duntroon – Zone map

Table 1: Australian Defence Force Academy and Royal Military College Duntroon - Permissible likely uses within Precincts
Precinct Primary purpose Permissible likely uses
Operational Support Precinct To provide areas for buildings or infrastructure for personnel supporting key capability functions. This precinct is intended to provide facilities for a Defence Installation and Scientific Research Establishment.

Base Support Precinct

To provide areas for activities associated with the general occupation and function of an establishment or facility, without adversely affecting operational or operational support activities.

This precinct is intended to provide facilities for a Defence Installation. Support activities that would be appropriate for this precinct would include Community Facility, Community Protection Facility, Child Care Centre, Indoor Recreation Facility, Outdoor Recreation Facility and Personal Services Establishment.

Domestic Precinct

To provide areas for activities associated with the domestic functions of an establishment or facility, without adversely affecting operational, operational support or base support activities.

This precinct is intended to provide Residential and Social/Community Facilities.

Open Space Precinct

To provide buffers between incompatible internal and external activities; to enable conservation and/or enhancement of land with significant environmental values; and to avoid land being targeted for future development on land that is unsuitable for such purposes.

This precinct is intended to provide facilities for a Defence Installation (training and recreation equipment), Landscape Buffer and Open Space.

Future Development Precinct

To identify larger parcels of developable land that can facilitate the future expansion of activities within the base or establishment. This precinct applies to uncommitted land and is to be retained for the future uses of the Defence Installation.

New developments with potential to provide services, recreational or community facilities to both ADFA and RMC should generally be located within the vicinity of General Bridges Drive.

Priority should be given to land uses which strongly relate to the academic and military training functions of the sites.

4.9.6 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

Urban design, building height and setback

New buildings, site works and landscape treatment should complement and enhance the existing facilities with special emphasis on three areas:

  • The RMC Duntroon Conservation Area;
  • The Main Entry to RMC Duntroon from Morshead Drive (‘The Badge Gates’); and
  • The Entry from Fairbairn Avenue (‘The Gun Gates’).

New buildings, site works and landscape treatment should complement and enhance the existing facilities with special emphasis on three areas:

  • The RMC Duntroon Conservation Area;
  • The Main Entry to RMC Duntroon from Morshead Drive (‘The Badge Gates’); and
  • The Entry from Fairbairn Avenue (‘The Gun Gates’).

All new work in the RMC Duntroon Conservation Area is to be consistent with the existing character in scale and by use of materials, treatment of façades and landscape works.

A limit of three storeys applies to all new buildings at RMC and four storeys at ADFA to maintain consistent scale of built form and protect the amenity of neighbouring buildings.

New residential buildings (excluding Live In Accommodation (LIA)) should be a maximum of two storeys in height. New residential buildings should generally be consistent with the height of existing residential development and be designed to protect the amenity of neighbouring buildings.

Where the development site abuts an existing dwelling or LIA, sufficient spatial separation should be provided to ensure the development does not adversely impact on residential amenity.

The siting and location of new development should be compatible with external land uses and set back 20 metres from arterial roads (Morshead Drive and Fairbairn Avenue) to provide a landscape buffer.

Landscape

A landscape structure is to be devised which adds to the legibility of the site by reinforcing the identity of each precinct, establishing pedestrian links and a hierarchy of vehicle circulation.

The open area of land along the ridgeline adjacent to General Bridges Drive will remain as a landscape buffer between RMC and ADFA. No buildings will be constructed within this zone.

Strong vegetative screening is to be maintained along Morshead Drive adjacent to the Operational Support Zone.

Landscape treatment of the perimeter areas is to be compatible with the adjacent land use, the adjacent road and the quality and character of the existing landscape. The perimeter landscape treatment must be a minimum of 20 metres wide, measured from the road verge (except where constrained by existing conditions).

The landscape treatment and the urban design elements (portals, etc) of the Main Entry (‘The Badge Gates’) to RMC should reflect the formal, prestigious role of the College. The planting of the entry avenue is to be of a formal, deciduous character, similar to the RMC Duntroon Conservation Area.

The Fairbairn Avenue (‘The Gun Gates’) entry, from Fairbairn Avenue to the RMC Duntroon Conservation Area (Robert Campbell Road) will be planted with Eucalypts to create a link to the rural surrounds and to retain views beneath the canopy to ADFA.

At the junction of the entry avenue and the RMC Duntroon Conservation Area emphasis is to be given to the change in landscape character. Beyond this point the road verge planting is to be continued in deciduous trees and the character of the spaces formalised.

Car parking, access and movement

All car parking demand generated by day to day activities should be accommodated within the confines of RMC and ADFA. Any parking that is displaced by new development is to be replaced elsewhere on the site.

Car parking should be designed and sited to ensure the safe and efficient movement of vehicles, including buses.

Developments should be integrated with the internal pedestrian network and provide safe and convenient access for pedestrians.

Development should ensure access is maintained to key sites along General Bridges Drive including the Duntroon Health Centre and General Bridges’ Grave.

Car parking is to be provided in small lots, well screened and landscaped.

Architectural character

The architectural character and quality of all buildings should be of a consistently high standard and should seek consistency in terms of scale, materials, colours, finishes and detail.

Perimeter development should be of a consistent architectural character and quality, befitting the national significance of the site and the Approach Routes to the National Capital.

Within the Operational Support Precinct, large stores and workshop buildings should be designed so as to limit their bulk and visual intrusion by, for example, articulation with recessed elements and varied setbacks.

The articulation, material and colour of building should be sympathetic to the heritage values of any adjacent heritage listed place.

Royal Military College Duntroon main entrance

Portal entry structures (‘Badge Gates’) should be retained to mark formal entry to the college from Morshead Drive.

New buildings should be located symmetrically of the avenue axis. Building character, materials and massing should be consistent with the character of the Parade Ground buildings.

Strong formal avenue planting should be established with a visual link to the round-about. Screening of residential and logistics complex from avenues is required.

4.9.7 Academy Close – Detailed conditions of planning design and development

4.9.7.1 Planning and urban design objectives

The site is to be redeveloped in single ownership to a quality appropriate to its location adjacent to an Approach Route. Specifically, development should:

  • make provision for Australian Defence Force personnel accommodation
  • respect the natural features, character and scale of the landscape in the locality
  • enhance the landscape character of Fairbairn Avenue as one of Walter Burley Griffin’s approach routes and as one of the main approaches to the Australian War Memorial
  • be carefully sited within a landscaped setting and screened from view of Fairbairn Avenue
  • allow for flexibility in design to ensure integration with the surrounding urban context
  • allow for buildings with an appropriate urban scale relationship to Fairbairn Avenue and adjacent suburban Campbell
  • ensure a high level of amenity is provided in site layout and urban design and that noise impacts are mitigated through appropriate building design, materials and construction
  • maintain and reinforce, where possible, the existing landscape character of the site to achieve a high quality redevelopment within a natural setting.

4.9.7.2 Concept plan

Figure 104 illustrates a proposed concept plan for development of the site. Specifically, the concept plan shows the following:

  • a detailed plan of dwelling layout and densities, that provides for appropriate dwelling orientation to achieve maximum solar access for the majority of dwellings
  • building setbacks, building height and scale (up to a maximum of two storeys above natural ground level)
  • indicative development staging (if necessary)
  • a general landscape plan that encourages the retention of existing trees of high quality and integration of these into the new landscape (where possible)
  • a parking plan showing scope for all visitor and resident parking on-site
  • requirements for fencing, including provision for fencing consistent with nature reserve and bushfire risk management
  • provisions for continued public right-of-way along the western side of the site adjacent to Blocks 26, 27, 28 and 29 Section 59 Campbell
  • continued vehicular access/egress to Truscott Street.

4.9.7.3 Site layout, built form, setbacks and solar access

  1. Site density is to be a maximum of 18 dwellings per hectare.
  2. Individual blocks must not be less than 260m².
  3. All dwellings must be setback from the boundary of Block 3 Section 65 Campbell a minimum of four metres. Dwellings must be setback the following minimum distances from individual internal block boundaries:
    • three metres to the front
    • two metres to the side
    • four metres to the rear.
  4. All dwellings must be sited to allow a minimum of three hours of direct sunlight onto the floor or internal wall of the main daytime living area of the dwelling between the hours of 9.00am and 3.00pm on 21 June (winter solstice).
  5. A minimum of 36m² of private open space must be provided per dwelling. This area of private open space is to be located to the rear of the dwelling.
  6. A minimum of 120m² of open space per dwelling must be provided in public open space areas.

4.9.7.4 Building materials and architectural quality

  1. Buildings and other permanent structures should be designed to a high architectural design standard.
  2. All building materials used on site must comprise high quality durable materials  consistent with the character of Campbell. Highly reflective external materials  are not permitted
  3. Building plant such as airconditioners must be contained within building form, or totally screened from view.
  4. Building materials, construction and finishes are to be responsive to microclimate issues. A high level of environmentally sustainable design is encouraged.

4.9.7.5 Landscape treatment and fencing

  1. A high standard of landscape design and verge treatment is required for the Truscott Street and Fairbairn Avenue frontages.
  2. Mature vegetation should be retained to the maximum extent practicable and integrated into the landscape design. Where existing trees must be removed, this should be compensated for by planting elsewhere on the site. A tree report must accompany proposals for development and justification provided for the removal of medium or high quality trees.
  3. All proposed fencing to external site boundaries must be constructed of high quality materials and integrated with the overall landscape design of the site.
  4. Landscape  treatments on site must be sympathetic to the surrounding area. Native species  of advanced stock should dominate new plantings.
  5. Additional landscape planting will be provided along the Truscott Street and Fairbairn Avenue verges adjacent to the site to reinforce the landscape character of this entrance to Campbell.
  6. Dwellings must be setback a minimum of 20 metres to the Truscott Street site boundary, and 10 metres from the Fairbairn Avenue site boundary.

4.9.7.6 Access and parking

  1. A single site access point to the site will be from Truscott Street. No access is permitted from Fairbairn Avenue.
  2. Access to individual dwellings must be from an internal, private loop road.
  3. Internal roads are to have a minimum road reservation of six metres and a minimum road pavement width of 3.5 metres. Visitor parking and passing bays are permitted on internal roads.
  4. All parking must be accommodated on site.
  5. Each dwelling must have a minimum of one car parking space. One visitor space per four dwellings or part there of must be provided.
  6. All private driveways and garages must front internal roads. No access to individual blocks will be permitted from Truscott Street or Fairbairn Avenue.
  7. A traffic and parking assessment must accompany development proposals for the site.
  8. Pedestrian right-of-way must be maintained along the western boundary of the site, to allow direct pedestrian access from Truscott Street through to the Canberra Nature Reserve.

4.9.7.7 Environmental considerations

  1. Any adverse environmental impacts from on-site developments or on adjacent land must be identified and redressed to the extent practicable.
  2. Environmental protection measures must be adopted to minimise possible adverse impacts of any new development or redevelopment on the physical environment, in terms of air quality, noise, waste water run-off, storm water run-off, dust, steam and smoke.

4.9.7.8 Lighting

  1. All outdoor lighting must be designed and sited to minimise light pollution. Outdoor lighting must use full cut-off light fittings.

4.9.7.9 Detailed design

  1. Detailed plans prepared for the development on the site will be subject to public notification and consultation.

Figure 104 - Academy Close - Master PlanFigure 104: Academy Close concept design


4.10 Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct Code

4.10.1 Precinct location

The Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct lies on the eastern slopes of Black Mountain. The Precinct is bound by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Black Mountain campus to the north-east, Clunies Ross Street and Parkes Way to the east and south, and the upper slopes of Black Mountain to the north and west.

Figure 105 illustrates the location of the Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct.

Figure 105: Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct locationFigure 105 - Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct location

4.10.2 Background

The Australian National Botanic Gardens (the Gardens) enjoy a prominent position within the Central National Area of the National Capital. The location of the Gardens on the slopes of Black Mountain and in close proximity to Lake Burley Griffin gives a rare scenic beauty to the Precinct. The predominant landscape environment and the sensitive siting of buildings under the natural tree cover further enhance the setting.

The Gardens have been consistently planned to serve as a scientific institution with an educational role while also providing visitors with a quiet natural haven complete with walking trails and picnic spots. Looking from the Gardens across Lake Burley Griffin, one can see such Canberra landmarks as Parliament House, and the National Library. Although somewhat camouflaged by the leafy canopy, the Gardens are visible from vantage points all around Lake Burley Griffin and the Central National Area, and including other locations such as the Australian National University, City and the CSIRO.

As a key feature of the original Griffin plan, the Gardens have special national significance. Situated partly within the original location and on adjacent land on the lower slopes of Black Mountain, the Gardens fulfil their role as a landscape backdrop to central Canberra. A favourable micro-climate allows an unequalled array of native flora to flourish thereby contributing positively to the character of the capital.

The gardens were included in the Griffin plan because they were an important element in a relationship which united the National Triangle, the Central National Area and other Designated Areas.

The commitment of the Gardens to Australian flora has a wider context. Since the inaugural tree planting in 1949, the Gardens have developed as the major national scientific and educational collection of Australian flora. The display of Australian native plants is recognised nationally and internationally as one of the most comprehensive in the world including, as an integrated resource, a national collection of living and herbarium specimens for study, conservation, interpretation and display.

The Gardens support the goal of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) as outlined by the Australian Government.   One of the principles of ESD, the maintenance of bio-diversity, is the basis of policies which sustain and expand the environmental resource base. The Gardens recognise the need to extend the range of species in cultivation for Australian flora to be adequately preserved, interpreted and protected for posterity. In doing so, it will further increase the botanical significance of the collection.

The scientific, aesthetic and recreational values of the Gardens have been recognised by inclusion in the Commonwealth Heritage List, thereby ensuring the protection of the philosophy, policies and physical structure of this precious natural resource.

The national significance of the Gardens is recognised as follows:

  • the Gardens are a national institution
  • the use of the site forms an integral component of Griffin's composition for Canberra
  • the Gardens contribute to the visual quality of the National Capital.

4.10.3 Objectives for Australian National Botanic Gardens

Precinct

  1. Ensure all developments are consistent with ESD principles.
  2. Contribute to the special characteristics of the National Capital within the context of a cohesive framework.
  3. Development of the Gardens will evolve incrementally and be capable of incorporating worthy changes within the framework in response to economic, administrative, management and environmental circumstances and in accordance with its national significance.
  4. Development will allow for the establishment, maintenance and display to the highest possible standard of the national collection of Australian native flora and related species. This is to include research, conservation, education and recreation enhancing the existing standard of landscape, built form and environmental design.
  5. Opportunities for the maintenance and enhancement of the linkages to adjacent sites and in particular the Central National Area, through paths and/or visual landscape corridors will be encouraged.

4.10.4 Land use for Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct

Land use for the Australian National Botanic Gardens Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 106.

Figure 106 - Land use for the Australian National Botanic Gardens PrecinctFigure 106: Land use for the Australian
National
Botanic
Gardens
Precinct
Figure 107 - Australian National Botanic Gardens Master PlanFigure 107: Australian National Botanic Gardens Master Plan

4.10.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

Activity location

The location of activities within the Australian National Botanic Gardens has an impact on national significance. The following principles and policies for activity location should reinforce national significance and allow the unique qualities of the site to continue.

Principles
  1. The location of visitor orientated displays should encourage maximum utilisation of established infrastructure and relate to a clearly defined pedestrian system.
  2. Future development should consolidate similar uses into defined common activity zones located to minimise conflicts between visitors, staff and servicing activities so as to contain dispersion of uses, minimise functional conflicts, and improve the operational effectiveness while maximising visitor amenity.
  3. Service trades functions should be consolidated wherever possible and generally be located within the Secondary Building Zone with rear service access from the service road network.
  4. Major building development, redevelopment opportunities and the location of major structures should be carefully determined in relation to their built form, landscape and environmental impacts and should be within either the Primary or Secondary Building Zone.
  5. Provide and enhance a 'gateway' to the site that befits its location and national significance.
Policies
  1. Consultation with the relevant authority is required for works affecting the heritage values of that part of the Gardens entered on the Commonwealth Heritage List whether for works within that land or within its immediate surroundings.
  2. Generally, visitor access to the Gardens should be via the major or primary entrance from Clunies Ross Street while service access should be from Frith Street. Vehicle circulation for service vehicles only is to be facilitated by a primary service vehicle route.
  3. Car parking facilities will generally be provided in formal car parks in the Primary Building Zone on the basis of the current provision of 223 spaces for visitors and a further 28 spaces for staff and official use. In addition, there will be four designated coach parking spaces provided.
  4. Within the Secondary Building Zone, car parking will be provided on the basis of 40 spaces for staff and 40 spaces for visitors in a landscaped setting well screened from Frith Street. The design of the parking areas will be in accordance with the appropriate Australian Standard.
  5. Development of areas identified as ‘under investigation for development’ will be subject to the preparation of a plan setting out development concepts, impacts and proposal details to the satisfaction of the National Capital Authority. Such a plan may form the basis of an amendment to the Precinct Code.

Landscape

The overall landscape structure should assist the integration of the Gardens within the contextual landscape provided by Black Mountain and adjacent land uses, and should exhibit national significance. The landscape structure of the Gardens will be predicated on the following principles and policies.

Principles
  1. The Gardens should maintain and enhance the site's unique landscape and environmental character and exhibit support for ESD.
  2. Opportunities should be encouraged for the enhancement and reinforcement of the physical, symbolic and visual linkages to adjoining areas of the Inner Hills and the Central National Area.
  3. Future development should recognise and reinforce the visual landscape character of the site as an integral part of the Central National Area, by preserving and reinforcing where possible the Eucalyptus canopy which extends down Black Mountain.
Policies
  1. Landscape treatment within the required landscape zone where shown on Figure 107 should be planned, implemented and maintained to provide a visual screening of car parks and service roads and accentuate the national significance of the Australian National Botanic Gardens. Screening should generally achieve a minimum planting width of six metres.
  2. A clearly defined and signed pedestrian system should be provided that focuses on existing and planned facilities. The system should be developed which takes into account walking distances, gradients, and provides maximum accessibility to as many visitor attractions as possible.
  3. The topography of the Gardens offer a range of opportunities for the design of car parks exploiting changes in level. Preference will be given to the planting of appropriate trees, shrubs and cascading ground covers to assist in reducing the visual impact of retaining walls and other hard surfacing.
  4. Site furniture should be designed within a coordinated theme reflecting the Australian landscape, and utilising local materials wherever possible.
  5. A coordinated thematic signage system integrated with the site furniture should be implemented to provide locational, directional, thematic and interpretative information.
  6. Generally the colour scheme to be used throughout the Gardens should reflect natural colours reflecting the landscape of the Australian native flora.
  7. The sensitive siting of artworks will be encouraged in locations which offer opportunities for artistic expression and the creative interaction between art and the forms, textures, and colours of the landscape context.

Environment

The Gardens contain elements of cultural significance, remnant vegetation, and sites of geomorphological and geological significance (refer to Figure 107). Part of the Gardens have significant heritage values, and for this reason has been placed on the Commonwealth Heritage List.

Principles
  1. The identification, conservation and interpretation of sites or elements of cultural or natural significance will take place, and development will be in accordance with the conservation values of those identified sites and elements.
  2. Development of the Gardens is to conform to relevant Commonwealth and ACT environmental legislation.
Policies
  1. Sites of cultural significance within the Gardens should be identified and if necessary a cultural resource survey carried out to clarify status before any development occurs. The sites will not be disturbed. The opportunity for sites to be available as an educational resource should be investigated.
  2. In general, remnant forest should be retained and managed for conservation, education and wildlife habitat. Isolated trees should be retained wherever possible. Trees which are dead or dying or in the senile phase should be retained if they exhibit habitat value, are not hazardous to the public (or can be rendered safe), and do not unduly detract from the aesthetic appeal of horticultural displays or occupy growing space better utilised by living specimens.
  3. Water draining from propagation facilities and standing-out areas should not be channelled directly to the stormwater system. Such water is to be retained within the Gardens site in appropriate structures (for example, retention ponds), and/or intercepted on-site in effluent filters (for example, artificial wetlands). Water retention/interception structures are to be in place before the construction of new development commences, and consideration should be given to their visual integration in the surrounding landscape.
  4. Sites of geomorphological significance are to be treated as an educational and scientific resource, and maintained in a way which is consistent with these values (for example, minimal disturbance of exposures; periodic removal of colonising plants). Consideration should be given to interpreting these features through appropriate signage and educational materials.
  5. Sites of geological significance are to be maintained as an unobscured exposure to preserve the scientific and educational values. Consideration should be given to interpreting these features through appropriate signage and educational materials.

Building

Whilst buildings within the Gardens are considered to be secondary to plant material, it is important that they have a character and form that acknowledges their function, the site’s national significance and their location within the site. Therefore, built form should be sympathetic and planned to assist and complement the landscape structure of the Gardens.

Principles
  1. Buildings of similar character and function should be grouped generally within the Primary and Secondary Building Zones to create and define spaces and add to the site's overall landscape structure to create a sequence of built form elements that assist and complement visitor education.
  2. Buildings should demonstrate ecologically sustainable development through their planning and construction reflecting the conservation of energy and the environment and demonstrating their positive contribution to enhancing the landscape character within the opportunities and constraints of an Australian environment.
  3. Provide for the continued development of the Gardens in accordance with its national significance and agreed plan of priorities set out in the Plan of Management.
Policies
  1. The scale and external treatment of buildings, including materials, colours and general standards of finish should ensure that the buildings, walls, fences and other ancillary structures, support and do not detract from the national significance of the site and are within the unity of an overall design theme.
  2. A plan is required to be prepared to the satisfaction of the National Capital Authority for any proposed building development within the Primary and Secondary Building Zones. Such a plan will include details of development concepts and, linkages, together with environment, landscape and visual impacts and details of floor area, building footprints, materials, colours and any other matters the National Capital Authority considers necessary.
  3. Generally, buildings should be of a scale that does not result in the domination of built form over the natural environment. Materials should demonstrate a sympathetic integration of architecture and environmental design, and colours should generally be passive using colour schemes sympathetic to the Australian natural environment.
  4. The maximum height of buildings in the Gardens is restricted to the height of the contextual tree canopy to maintain the visual integrity of the Inner Hills. In order to ensure visual integrity is maintained, a visual assessment of the site as viewed from external public vantage points will be required for any building or dominant structure development. Buildings and other dominant structures should not be placed on or near prominent ridges.
  5. The erection of structures above roofs and signage should comply with the Design and Siting and Signs General Codes.


4.11 Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct Code

4.11.1 Precinct location

The Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct is bound by the Molonglo River to the north, Lake Burley Griffin to the west and Dairy Road to the east. The southern boundary of the Precinct skirts the western section of Jerrabomberra Creek where it drains to Lake Burley Griffin, and proceeds in a westerly direction in the vicinity of the rail line to its point of intersection with Dairy Road.

Figure 108 illustrates the location of the Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct.

Figure 108 - Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct locationFigure 108: Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct location

4.11.2 Background

The Jerrabomberra Wetlands were formed following the filling of Lake Burley Griffin and the expansion of a natural wetland that had developed on the floodplain of the Molonglo River. The wetland and other habitats support a wide range of aquatic wildlife including over 170 species of birds, some of which are protected under international treaties.

The Jerrabomberra Wetlands are situated in the heart of the National Capital and are an integral part of the parkland system that has been developed around Lake Burley Griffin. The lake provides a key landscape element which unites the city and provides the setting for many of the buildings of the Central National Area as well as being a focus for a wide range of activities for Canberra residents and tourists.

The Jerrabomberra Wetlands are located close to the centre of Canberra, and therefore are close to a large population centre and tourist destination. This provides a unique opportunity to develop the area's potential as a nature education and interpretation centre. This would enable residents, tourists and international visitors to develop their understanding about conservation and wetland ecology as part of their enjoyment of the National Capital.

The challenge of the Jerrabomberra Wetlands is to ensure that a significant ecological resource in the centre of Canberra is protected and maintained while being used sensitively for residents and tourists in ways which enrich their experience of the National Capital and develop greater community awareness and appreciation of the natural environment.

4.11.3 Objectives for Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct

  1. Define and maintain Jerrabomberra Wetlands as a protected wildlife refuge, in a National Capital and urban context, with facilities designed to realise the area's potential as a significant conservation and education resource for Canberra residents, tourists and international visitors.
  2. Protect Jerrabomberra Wetland’s ecological resources, geomorphological features and aquatic conditions, and maintain a diversity of wetland and other habitats for wildlife conservation.
  3. Provide for the use of Jerrabomberra Wetlands as a significant educational resource which promotes educational activities appropriate to the area such as nature appreciation, fosters public awareness about wetland ecosystems, and facilities interpretation about birds and other aquatic wildlife. The area is also to be available for scientific research related to wetland environments.
  4. Maintain and enhance the rural and floodplain landscape character and strengthen the perception and appreciation of the Jerrabomberra Wetlands and its surroundings as an integral part of the landscape of Lake Burley Griffin and the setting for the National Capital.
  5. Facilitate recreational use, education and interpretation programmes, and informal and quiet enjoyment of the area's natural qualities while protecting Jerrabomberra Wetlands as a significant conservation resource in an urban setting. A range of facilities should be provided from Visitor Information Centres and bird-hides to information signs and paths.
  6. Provide for the continuation of current essential urban service infrastructure (electricity, water supply, sewerage). Any future proposal for new or upgraded services will be required to demonstrate that there are no prudent or feasible alternatives to locating new infrastructure within Jerrabomberra Wetlands Nature Reserve. If this can be demonstrated, works will be required to protect the nature conservation core areas and all reasonable measures to minimise adverse impacts must be taken.
  7. Facilitate planning, development and management of the Jerrabomberra Wetlands as a part of the National Capital Open Space System and in a manner which sustains specific uses consistent with conservation of its wetlands habitats, protects it from the impacts of external land uses, and ensures the wetlands are maintained and used in the broader context of planning for the whole of the Molonglo River and Jerrabomberra Creek floodplain and the Lake Burley Griffin Technical and Management Guidelines.

4.11.4 Land use for Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct

Land use for the Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 109.

Figure 109 - Land use for the Jerrabomberra Wetlands PrecinctFigure 109: Land use for the Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct

4.11.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

Figure 110 - Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct - Policy zonesFigure 110: Jerrabomberra Wetlands Precinct – Policy zones

Nature Conservation Core Area (A1 and A2)

The existing wetland habitat is significant both for its nature conservation value and its potential for public viewing and interpretation in an urban location. The Nature Conservation Core Area is primarily identified for conservation and protection of wetland habitat and associated wildlife, where carefully controlled public access can be provided for interpretative and educational activities. Within the Core Area zoning can provide for bird refuge areas with general public access excluded, and for other areas where public facilities and access is provided. Overall, emphasis will be placed on habitat diversity rather than significant increases in general waterbird populations in order to minimise the risk of birdstrike to aircraft using Canberra Airport.

A1: Jerrabomberra Backwaters

This area is to be maintained as a wildlife refuge area with a diversity of habitats for aquatic wildlife and particularly birdlife, and protected from uncontrolled access from Lake Burley Griffin and adjacent lands. Controlled access for public interpretation, consistent with the area's refuge status, may be provided from Area A2. Existing access track to be retained for management purposes only.

A2: Jerrabomberra Pool and Kelly's Swamp Environs

This area is to be maintained and developed as a diverse habitat for waterbirds with facilities for public access, viewing and interpretation including information centres, hides and display areas to enable people to view wildlife at reasonably close quarters and understand about wetland ecology. The Jerrabomberra land fill area is to be rehabilitated and landscaped with a particular emphasis on creating habitat for land birds.

Wetland Buffer Zone (B1 and B2)

Dairy Flat provides a distinctive rural landscape with an open, grazed floodplain as the foreground to views of the Central National Area. There is an opportunity to preserve this character within a rural buffer zone which complements and protects the Nature Conservation Core Area. Some of the former farm buildings and land adjacent to Kelly's Swamp are used for educational purposes.

B1: Dairy Flat West

This area is to be maintained as a rural buffer zone to protect the Wetlands and the agricultural landscape character of the Dairy Flat floodplain. The ephemeral wetland area near Molonglo Reach is to be maintained and used for public interpretation.

The option for the development of further aquatic habitats for conservation and/or recreation purposes is to be retained. This would be subject to advice from the relevant Australian Government agency that this would not increase the risk of birdstrikes to aircraft.

B2: Dairy Flat Centre

Use of the buildings and land adjacent to Kelly's swamp is to continue as an educational facility consistent with the area's additional role as part of the buffer zone to the Nature Conservation Core Area.

Recreation area (C1)

The tree-lined margins of the Molonglo River are an important habitat component of the wetland complex. There could be some low intensity recreation and public access compatible with protection of the birdlife and habitats associated with these riverine areas.

C1: Molonglo Reach Recreation

The southern bank of Molonglo Reach to be developed and used as an informal riverside area with controlled public access. Wildlife habitat, including the marginal, riverine vegetation, is to be protected and maintained for birdlife and other semi-aquatic fauna. The north-eastern portion may be more intensively developed with picnic facilities.

High and Low Voltage Distribution Sub-Transmission Lines (Areas D1, D2, D3 and D4)

A number of high and low voltage lines cross Jerrabomberra Wetlands/Dairy Flat as key elements in the provision of electricity supply to Canberra. They have a visual effect on the landscape and views across Lake Burley Griffin to the Central National Area and can present a hazard to waterbirds. These environmental effects should be minimised when opportunities arise, but this will depend upon the extent and timing of developments in adjacent areas and the degree to which some lines can be removed.

D1: Causeway to City East and Bruce

The two existing 132 kV lines linking the Causeway substation to the City East and Bruce substations are to be retained.

D2: Existing Causeway to Oaks Estate

The existing 66 kV line and adjacent 11 kV line are to be retained temporarily to provide an 11 kV link between Kingston and Fyshwick, after which they are to be removed.

D3: Causeway to Gilmore 132 Kv Sub-Transmission Line Easement

An easement is required for a 132 kV line connecting the Causeway and Gilmore substations.

D4: 11 Kv Distribution Lines

Further work is to be undertaken to minimise the impact of the 11kV distribution lines.

Cycleway (Area E1)

The completion of the recreation cycleway system and Lake Burley Griffin is an important objective. It requires the construction of a cycleway in or adjacent to the area covered by these conditions.

E1: Lake Burley Griffin Cycleway System

A cycleway is to be established in order to complete the system around the Lake and to provide a connection to Fyshwick. The route is to be determined following further analysis, but would not pass through Area A1. It would pass through Area A2 in a manner which would be compatible with protection of the area's nature conservation and interpretation values. It would cross Jerrabomberra Creek east of Jerrabomberra Pool with much of its length being in the eastern portion of Area B1.

Water Supply (Area F1)

The bulk supply main carrying domestic water between Googong Reservoir and North Canberra crosses the wetland buffer area.

F1: Googong Bulk Supply Main

The existing bulk supply water main connecting Googong Reservoir and North Canberra is to be retained.

Sewerage (Area G1)

A sewerage rising main exists between the Fyshwick Sewerage Plant and Kingston. Its operation has not been satisfactory in recent years and its replacement is required.

G1: Fyshwick to Kingston Sewerage Rising Main

Use of the Fyshwick to Kingston sewerage rising main is to continue with upgrading to more efficient operation using a similar route.


4.12 Lake Burley Griffin And Foreshores Precinct Code

4.12.1 Precinct location

The Lake Burley Griffin Foreshores Precinct comprises of Lake Burley Griffin and the areas of central parkland and open space surrounding it. These areas include Grevillea Park, Black Mountain Peninsula and Yarramundi Reach on the northern foreshores, and Bowen Park, Weston Park, Lennox Gardens and Yarralumla Beach on the southern foreshores. Other key sites included in the Precinct include the Governor-General’s estate, and the National Zoo and Aquarium.

Figure 111 - Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores Precinct locationFigure 111: Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores Precinct location

4.12.2 Background

Lake Burley Griffin is an integral part of the design of Canberra and a vital and key element in the plan for the National Capital. The lake is not only one of the centrepieces of Canberra’s plan in its own right but also forms the immediate foreground of the Parliamentary Zone.

Lake Burley Griffin has become an important recreational resource for Canberra’s residents and visitors, but there is a need to identify ways in which the lake can be used to further unify the city as a whole both functionally and in landscape terms.

The National Capital Authority will support the development of recreational, tourist and National Capital uses of the Lake and its foreshores. A well defined system of lakeside drives, park access roads and public transport access should be maintained so that residents and visitors can get to the lake and its parks without disturbing nearby areas unduly.

The lakeside pedestrian path/cycle way around the entire lake needs to be completed. The link around the eastern part of the lake is to be built in a manner which does not compromise the conservation values of the Jerrabomberra Wetlands. A ferry service from the ferry terminal to the Parliamentary Zone and other tourist nodes will be supported if it is commercially feasible.

The Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores Precinct is part of the National Capital Open Space System. The principle and policies set out in section 3.2 will apply as well as the principle and policies below.

4.12.3 Objectives for Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores

  1. To conserve and develop Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores as the major landscape feature unifying the National Capital’s central precincts and the surrounding inner hills and to provide for National Capital uses and a diversity of recreational opportunities.
  2. Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores should remain predominantly as open space parklands while providing for existing and additional National Capital and community uses in a manner consistent with the areas’ national symbolism and role as the city’s key visual and landscape element.
  3. Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores are intended to provide a range of recreational, educational and symbolic experiences of the National Capital in both formal and informal parkland settings with particular landscape characters or themes. These should be maintained and further developed to create a diversity of landscape and use zones which are integrated into the landscape form of the city and reflect the urban design principles for the National Capital.
  4. The water quality and hydraulic operation of the lake should be maintained in a manner designed to protect Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshore’s visual and symbolic role.

4.12.4 Land use for Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores

Land use for the Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 112 and as detailed below. The range of uses permitted in Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores will be the following:

  • Aquatic Recreation Facility
  • Club (related to lake use only)
  • Community Facility
  • Landscape Buffer
  • National Capital Use
  • Outdoor Education Establishment
  • Park
  • Pathway Corridor
  • Public Utility
  • Reserve
  • Restaurant
  • Restricted Access Open Space
  • Road
  • Single Dwelling Housing (Block 6 Section 4 Yarralumla only)
  • Scientific Research Establishment
  • Tourist Facility (not including a service station

Figure 112 - Land use for the Lake Burely Griffin and Foreshores PrecinctFigure 112: Land use for the Lake Burley Griffin and Foreshores Precinct

4.12.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

Parkland recreation

The following areas are to be generally available for public recreation and free public access:

  • Commonwealth Park
  • Kings Park
  • Grevillea Park
  • Bowen Park
  • Lennox Gardens
  • Weston Park
  • Black Mountain Peninsula
  • Yarralumla Beach

For significant recreational events public access restrictions may be imposed in respect of limited parts of the above areas for limited periods and entry fees may be charged for access to those parts set aside for the event. In deciding specific proposals the National Capital Authority will require continuity of access to the beaches and shores of Lake Burley Griffin and will consider the need for access to other public facilities such as cycle paths, toilets, picnic shelters and children’s playgrounds.

Some Commercial concessions such as refreshments and other facilities for visitors will be allowed in these areas but only when they are compatible with the recreation use.

The policies are to provide parkland with particular landscape character or themes for particular areas so as to achieve a diversity of recreation settings, some of which will be less developed than others.

Commonwealth Park will continue to be developed as an intensely used horticultural park for informal recreation and for major group and festive activities. Stage 88 Music Bowl has been developed in Commonwealth Gardens near Nerang Pool and Commonwealth Park will be linked to Kings Park by a pedestrian promenade along the Lake foreshore.

The north western part of Commonwealth Park will be developed for detailed horticultural display, including a conservatory and walled and scented gardens. Another kiosk refreshment room / restaurant may also be built in Commonwealth Park. The development of Kings Park will be reviewed in the context of pressures on Commonwealth Park.

Grevillea Park, Bowen Park and Lennox Gardens are to be major lakeside vantage points and special landscape parks with emphasis on seasonable landscape effects. In Grevillia Park and Lennox Gardens, sites may be provided for small scale developments which relate directly to the recreational use and enjoyment of the Lake.

Weston Park, Yarralumla Beach, Black Mountain Peninsula and Acton Park will continue to be predominantly urban recreation parks with beachside swimming, special playgrounds, and barbecue areas. Beachside recreation areas are to be extended in suitable places. Development is to be limited to small scale items that help recreation and tourism. They may include commercial concessions for kiosks, refreshment rooms, restaurants, other entertainment, and hire facilities as appropriate to the area.

This will not include the development of private licensed clubs or the extension of facilities other than those that already exist at the Canberra Yacht Club.

New clubhouses or boatsheds for rowing or canoe clubs may be located on the western side of Black Mountain Peninsula if they cannot be accommodated in Yarralumla Bay. The buildings will be subject to design controls to ensure that they fit in with the landscape of the Lake.

Regatta Point Exhibition must be retained for use as a tourist exhibition site, with allowance for commercial concessions for kiosks, refreshment rooms and restaurants as appropriate to the area.

The Lake

The policy is to allow all users of the Lake access to all its waters and its foreshore (except as may have been agreed under provisions of the Lakes Ordinance) while minimising the problem of conflicting demands. It may therefore be necessary to:

  • Limit the facilities and number of access points for some activities, and restrict launching areas to specific sections of the Lake where there will be no danger to swimmers
  • Restrict parking so that it does not prevent the enjoyment of any area or downgrade the appearance of the lakeshore.

These steps will be considered in the light of any potential conflict of uses and with due consideration for questions of hydraulics and water quality.

In Yarramundi and Tarcoola reaches and in Westlake, the degree of diverse natural shoreline and good water quality are to be maintained. The shoreline macrophyte areas which are important fish and waterbird habitats in Yarramundi Inlet and Nursery Bay are to be protected.

Yarramundi Reach is to accommodate a rowing course as well as other boating. Westlake and West Basin are to remain the main areas for sailing, sailboarding and beachside swimming. Moorings for Yachts are to be provided in selected locations and consideration may be given to constructing a marina in Lotus Bay. The formal national capital character of the Lake as a key element of the Griffin Plan is to be fully expressed in the Central Basin, while East and West Basins are to respond to the architectural character of the central area.

Existing facilities for the floating gate in Yarramundi Inlet (used to operate Scrivener Dam) are to be retained.

Molonglo River is to provide a quiet backwater for boating, fishing and birdwatching. The tree-lined banks and marginal habitats for waterbirds, fish and aquatic mammals are to be protected. Upstream of Dairy Road Bridge, the Molonglo River may be used for power boats and water skiing.

The masses of submerged aquatic plants between Springbank Island and Acton Peninsula are to be controlled and the Lake may be deepened here if necessary. Macrophyte beds in East Basin may be retained as a means of controlling algae.

Ferry wharfs may be provided in various places. Fishing and viewing platforms may also be provided in selected locations.

Development nodes

Development is to be limited to uses related to recreation and tourism and may include commercial concessions for kiosks, refreshment rooms or restaurants, other tourist purposes, and fire facilities, subject to agreements made under the provisions of the Lakes Ordinance. Tourist accommodation will not be permitted at Acton Park or Yarralumla Bay.

The types of use and development are to conform to the guidelines for lakeshore development set out below and will be subject to stringent conditions to ensure that development harmonises with the surrounding areas. In all cases public access to the lakeshore will be preserved.

Development of Blocks 1 and 2 Molonglo Valley is to be limited to a zoo and associated tourist facilities. The development is to be generally screened from the Tuggeranong Parkway with the site having an appropriate open woodland landscape character.

Buildings and structures will be subject to design controls to ensure that they are of high quality complementary to the Lake Burley Griffin western foreshores landscape and are generally unobtrusive when viewed from the Tuggeranong Parkway.

The National Capital Authority will require a Master Plan to be submitted and approved before the proposal to perform works is submitted to the National Capital Authority.

Conservation

Yarramundi Reach’s natural shoreline and key wetland waterbird and aquatic mammal breeding habitat in Warrina, Yarramundi and Acacia Inlets will be conserved and protected.

The following sites of significance around the Lake will be given special consideration to protect them in the most appropriate way, and conservation plans will be prepared for key sites:

  • Jerrabomberra Wetlands
  • Blundells Cottage
  • Acton Geological Site
  • Black Mountain Peninsula
  • Stirling Park
  • Government House
  • Westbourne Woods
  • Canberra Incinerator
  • Acacia, Yarramundi and Warrina Inlet Wetlands
  • Commonwealth Park Geological Site

Location specific

ACT Hospice site

Development of the site for the ACT Hospice, on the northern foreshore of East Basin, is to be integrated with the landscape of the foreshore. The landscape of the site should be of an open parkland character consistent with that of Grevillea Park. The plantings near Morshead Drive should be predominantly native as a backdrop to the deciduous trees along the Lake edge. There should be limited views into the site from Menindee Drive with predominant views from the development being to East Basin and the Molonglo River. The site, which is exclusively for the use of the ACT Hospice, is to be set back from the Lake edge to allow for public recreation and free public access along the immediate Lake foreshore. The site is to be the subject of detailed Site Planning, Design and Development Conditions, in accordance with the Guidelines for Lakeshore Development and the Guidelines for Siting of Buildings in the Lake Flood Zone as set out below. The Design and Siting General Code is also applicable to development, however, in the event of any contradictions the Detailed Conditions below take precedence.

Detailed site planning, design and development conditions

Visual impact

The foreshore of East Basin is an important landscape vantage-point with emphasis on seasonal landscape effects. Development on the site should therefore be designed to blend with the surrounding environment.

Built form

Buildings are to be of a domestic scale and designed to avoid the appearance of a large building mass, when viewed from the Lake and from adjoining land. Buildings are to be single storey construction.

Roof forms are to be flat or gently sloping with a view to keeping the height of the buildings as low as practicable.

Materials

Materials and colours selected for buildings should be compatible with the adjoining ‘Boat House by the Lake’ building and be inconspicuous to achieve a high degree of integration with the setting.

Siting

Buildings on the site should be positioned as far as practicable away from the adjacent development so that each development appears in its own landscape setting.

Buildings should be sited to ensure that members of the public are not deterred from moving freely through the foreshore public open space.

Siting and access

Parking areas are to be generally located to the north of the site with a clearly identified safe entry point off Menindee Drive.

Parking for the development is to be provided at a minimum rate of one space per bed plus one space per staff member.

Service areas

Service areas are to be located on the northern/eastern side(s) of the development and should be screened from view.

Environmental impact

Works designed for the site are to have regard for environmental impacts of the development.

Adverse impacts on the Jerrabomberra Wetlands (a protected habitat for migratory birds) are to be avoided;

A Conservation Management Plan, that records any heritage values and provides relevant management recommendations, is to be prepared.

Off-site works

An all weather pedestrian pathway is to be provided and maintained along the southern edge of the site within the public open space reserve. This work is to be carried out at the same time as the first stage of the hospice development.

Landscape

The landscape treatment is to reflect the seasonal planting scheme applying to the Grevillea Park land with deciduous planting on the site towards the Lake edge and native planting towards the Morshead Drive side of the site.

The existing plantings on the site should be retained as far as practicable. In particular the poplar stand and other plantings adjacent to the ‘Boat House by the Lake’ should be retained as far as practicable, as part of the site landscape.

Site establishment works

A site establishment plan is to be provided as part of the application for works approval. That plan is to show where materials are to be stored and how significant existing trees are to be protected throughout the construction phase. The arrangements should minimise any disruption to the general access by the public along the foreshore area and to the operation of the ‘Boat House by the Lake’ restaurant.

Refer to the Jerrbomberra Wetlands Precinct Code which applies in Area D.

Refer to the Design and Siting General Code which apply to all blocks.

Guidelines for Lakeshore Development and the Guidelines for Siting of Buildings in the Lake Flood Zone

The normal mode of operation of the flood gates should be to release flow at Scrivener Dam at approximately the same rate as the inflow to the Lake from all sources less losses. This will maintain a nearly constant Lake level in East Basin equal to the normal Lake level of RL555.93.

The Guideline for Lakeshore Development Sites follow.

Commercial concessions

The placement, form and colour of buildings and/or structures on any land leased for these developments are to be subject to detailed site planning standards to ensure that the development is in harmony with the Lake landscape and does no harm to the environment of the Lake. Public access is to be maintained around such buildings and between the buildings and the lakeshore.

Boatsheds, clubhouses and other recreational or community development directly related to the use of the Lake

The placement, form and colour of buildings on any land leased for these developments will be subject to detailed site planning standards to ensure that the development is in harmony with the Lake landscape and does no harm to the environment of the Lake. Public access is to be maintained around such buildings and between the buildings and the lakeshore.

Major lakeside buildings, special national capital attractions and other tourist developments

The placement, form and colour of buildings on any land used for these developments will be subject to detailed site planning standards to ensure that the development is in harmony with the Lake landscape and does no harm to the environment of the Lake.

Lake maintenance and boat servicing

The placement, form and colour of buildings on any land used for these developments will be subject to detailed site planning standards to ensure that they are in harmony with the lakeside setting.

The Guideline for Siting of Buildings in the Lake Flood Zone will be as set out below.

Siting Policies

Buildings in the Lake flood zone will be subject to the following controls:

  1. Residential Areas: All habitable floors are to be above the 100 year flood level.
  2. Commercial Areas: Walkways, service areas, basements are to be above the 100 year flood level.
  3. Institutional Areas: Walkways, service areas, basement carparks are to be above the 100 year flood level.
  4. Archives, reference collections, etc. are to be above the 500 year flood, with the establishment of emergency measures to safeguard collections in the event of a more extreme flood.

Structures should be designed and sited so that they do not make flood levels worse, upstream or downstream. They should be capable of withstanding the forces created by flood water pressure and prevent accumulation of flood debris, in accordance with the requirements of the Building Ordinance.

Floating structures must be securely and suitably anchored or be capable of rapid removal to safe anchorage in the event of a very large flood; otherwise they could be a danger to the flood gates on Scrivener Dam.


4.13 Acton Peninsula Precinct Code

4.13.1 Precinct location

Acton Peninsula Precinct is bounded by Lake Burley Griffin to the east, south and west with the boundary to the ANU precinct forming the northern boundary west of Lawson Crescent.

Figure 113 illustrates the location of the Acton Peninsula Precinct.

Figure 113 - Acton Peninsula Precinct locationFigure 113: Acton Peninsula Precinct location

4.13.2 Background

Acton Peninsula's national significance is derived from its importance in the Griffin Plan and its demonstration of the unique relationship between the city and the landscape in the National Capital. The Peninsula visually connects Black Mountain to the Lake and provides a landscape edge and setting to the West Basin of Lake Burley Griffin.

This is further enhanced by Acton Peninsula's historical and cultural importance in the development of the Australian Capital Territory. The Peninsula was the first site settled by Europeans in the Canberra region and was the administrative centre for the development of the National Capital until after World War II.

Its national significance is reinforced through its proximity to the Parliamentary Zone which enables direct views of the National Library, National Gallery, and the High Court of Australia.

4.13.3 Objectives for Acton Peninsula Precinct

As a place of national significance, Acton Peninsula has an important functional and symbolic role within the National Capital. Activities and uses should contribute to vitality and viability of the city. They should build upon the magnificent setting; preserving and enhancing the existing landform, landscape, heritage and lake frontage. Uses also should demonstrate the Peninsula's relationship to the rest of the Central National Area.

To meet these goals, developments on Acton Peninsula should achieve the following objectives:

  1. express the importance of the location and the role of the Peninsula in the National Capital
  2. reinforce the visual connection to Parliament House, the Parliamentary Zone, City Centre and to the Brindabella Mountains
  3. ensure Acton Peninsula remains accessible to all Australians
  4. express the activities and operations of the various institutions as well as the importance of each location
  5. acknowledge the importance of, and maintain, the existing landscape setting
  6. create an urban form which responds to the landscape and topography
  7. protect the qualities and features of places of heritage significance
  8. encourage the design of sustainable, energy-efficient, environmentally responsive, human scaled, timeless architecture and landscape.

4.13.4 Land use for Acton Peninsula Precinct

Land use for the Acton Peninsula Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 114.

Figure 114 - Land use for the Acton Peninsula PrecinctFigure 114: Land use for the Acton Peninsula Precinct

The permitted land use for Acton Peninsula (east of Lawson Crescent) is National Capital Use. Facilities which provide for local ceremonial or other cultural activities which complement and are ancillary to National Capital Uses on the site may be permitted.

The following uses are permitted for the ‘Medical Superintendent’s Residence’, 'H  Block', 'Former Isolation Ward' and ‘Limestone House’:

  • Consulting Rooms
  • Research Facility
  • Educational Establishment
  • Office
  • Restaurant.

4.13.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

Acton Peninsula should contribute to the urban fabric by providing a location for National Capital Uses requiring a less formal setting than the National Triangle.

Design and development should ensure that the built form and open space are properly integrated, that Canberra's urban structure is recognised, and that the site's natural features are encapsulated in the development.

The character and quality of the built form and open space on Acton Peninsula should reflect the national importance of the site, demonstrate an environmental sensitivity, and epitomise leading practice in Australian design and construction.

Urban structure (refer Figure 115)

The built form and site development should respond both to the character of the contextual landscape (i.e. the eucalypt woodland of Black Mountain and the exotic vegetation of West Basin) and to the specific landscape qualities and elements of the Peninsula. These include, but are not restricted to, such elements as identified heritage sites and trees, and significant views to City Hill, the Parliamentary Zone and Parliament House.

The overall configuration and disposition of the built form, circulation systems and the open space must respond to the key natural and cultural features of the site, incorporating these elements where appropriate.

The siting and design of the principle circulation systems and the buildings on the Peninsula must respond principally to the axis of King Edward Terrace and secondarily to the City Hill alignment.

Figure 115 - Acton Peninsula - Urban structureFigure 115: Acton Peninsula – Urban structure

Open space

The development of the Peninsula should establish a clear hierarchy of spaces which will support a variety of visitor activities and experiences and which will create a logical sequence in visitor circulation.

Landscape and open space design should provide a visual extension of the Black Mountain vegetation along the western side of the Peninsula.

Landscape and open space design should extend the exotic landscape treatment around West Basin.

Development on the foreshore should encourage a variety of recreational opportunities.

Buildings should be separated by contiguous open space.

Opportunities for interaction between Lake Burley Griffin and development proposals should be maximised.

Development on the Peninsula must contribute positively to the contiguous system of parks and open space around Lake Burly Griffin.

The principle circulation system, the siting of buildings and the development of key public spaces must be designed to incorporate key natural and cultural features on the site as well as to take full advantage of the main vistas to City Hill, the Parliamentary Zone and Parliament House.

The siting of buildings and the detailed design of the open space must respond to the microclimate of the site to provide wind protection, winter sun and summer shade.

Landscape character (refer Figure 116)

The contribution of the existing landscape setting should be recognised.

Existing plant species are to form a significant component of the landscape design for the Peninsula.

The predominant character of the landscape development must complement the landscape character of Black Mountain and West Basin.

Development must not damage remnant native vegetation.

Predominantly exotic species are to be used on the eastern side of the Peninsula within a defined theme.

Figure 116 - Acton Peninsula - Landscape characterFigure 116: Acton Peninsula – Landscape character

Built form (refer Figure 117)

Any new development should be designed to take advantage of the views between the Peninsula and City Hill, Commonwealth Avenue, the Parliamentary Zone, and Parliament House. Opportunities for visitors to enjoy views toward the Brindabella Mountains and the western Lake should also be provided.

The siting of buildings should respond to the alignments of the former Lennox Crossing, King Edward Terrace and City Hill axes, as depicted in Figure 115 and Figure 117.

Design should respond to the site topography, views, landmarks, vegetation, orientation, microclimate, drainage and services.

The architecture and landscape design should contribute positively to the unique identity of the Peninsula.

Buildings should be consolidated into precincts.

The massing and bulk of large structures should be modulated to reduce their apparent scale and impact.

The built form should emphasise the natural terrain.

The scale and proportion of all structures should integrate the built form harmoniously into the site and environs.

Buildings should be energy efficient, utilising leading practice passive design strategies.

Figure 117 - Acton Peninsula - Built formFigure 117: Acton Peninsula – Built form

Building height

Buildings are not to protrude above the tree canopy and will be limited in height to a maximum of 16 metres above natural ground level.

A landmark structure or building element in excess of 16 metres high may be considered at the end of the lower Peninsula in the locality indicated on Figure 117.

No building or structure exceeding RL 617 in height will be permitted.

Building design

Finished floor levels of each building must comply with requirements of Guideline for Lakeshore Development Sites and Guideline for Siting of Buildings.

Buildings must respond to the climate through use of devices such as sun shades which add depth and modelling to the building faces and maximise energy efficiency.

Roof forms (including mechanical plant, service systems and the like) are to be integrated with the design of the buildings.

Lift overruns and roof mounted plant and other structures are permitted only if contained within an enclosure appropriate to the roof form.

Material and finishes

Building materials, finishes and details should be high quality reflecting the national significance of the site and its uses.

Materials must be low maintenance, durable, with a design life in excess of 50 years.

Highly reflective wall or roof materials are not permitted.

The lower portions of buildings from ground to first floor level must be well articulated and modulated to provide scale and shelter for people circulating around the buildings.

The size and detailing of the material in the lower portions of the buildings must similarly be of an appropriate human scale to provide richness and interest.

Heritage (refer Figure 118)

Developments on Acton Peninsula must respond to and incorporate recommendations and management practices prepared as part of a Conservation Management Plan for the protection and/or conservation of elements considered of significant natural and cultural heritage.

The historic Lennox Crossing landscape corridor should be maintained.

The cultural and historic importance of the area should be acknowledged.

Where appropriate, future developments should incorporate key heritage elements on the Peninsula.

Figure 118 - Acton Peninsula - HeritageFigure 118: Acton Peninsula – Heritage

Transport and movement (refer Figure 119)

Acton Peninsula should be accessible and relevant to all Australians.

A clear hierarchy of roads and paths which creates a logical, legible and safe visitor circulation and site servicing pattern should be provided.

The local road and path system should provide a legible and safe network for cyclists and pedestrians.

Public access to the entire foreshore should be maintained. Continuous pedestrian access is required around the Lake edge of the Peninsula.

Cycle access between west Lake Burley Griffin and West Basin must be maintained.

Pathways are to meet current accessibility requirements.

Lawson Crescent is to be maintained as the main access road to the site.

Separate service and public access roads are to be provided.

Facilities suitable for future ferry or water taxi services to Acton Peninsula should be provided. Jetty facilities must have direct pedestrian links to the main building entry(s).

Impacts of surface parking should be minimised by use of parking structures, landscaping and basement parking.

Provision for public transport terminals, stations, alignments and parking should be made.

Servicing access should meet emergency and functional needs.

Car parking

Proponents of new developments on the lower Peninsula are required to provide on-site car parking to meet 95 percentile demand as agreed by the National Capital Authority.

The impact of car parking on the Peninsula is to be minimised by use of structured and/or underground parking and through effective use of landscaping.

Figure 119 - Acton Peninsula - Transport and movementFigure 119: Acton Peninsula – Transport and movement

Detailed site development

There should be a positive relationship between buildings and the landscape with the all main building entries and exits to be from a ‘natural’ ground level. Elevated entries are to be minimised.

A minimum three per cent gradient away from the base of all buildings is to be established.

Surface drainage must be collected and dissipated on site. Appropriate measures to reduce runoff to the Lake are to be provided.

Overall the developed landscape must be one that has an efficient energy budget and one that can be effectively and easily maintained and managed.


4.14 Diplomatic Precinct (Yarralumla, Deakin And O’Malley) Code

4.14.1 Precinct location

Figure 120 - Yarralumla and Deakin Diplomatic Precinct locationFigure 120: Yarralumla and Deakin
Diplomatic
Precinct
location
Figure
Figure 121 - O Malley Diplomatic Precinct location 121: O’Malley Diplomatic Precinct location

The Diplomatic Precinct is comprised of three separate areas:

  • Yarralumla
  • Deakin
  • O’Malley.

A number of diplomatic sites are also located in Red Hill (Figure 27 and Figure 28) and are subject to this Precinct Code.

4.14.2 Background

Australian’s international obligations in regard to diplomatic missions are outlined in the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. Under this convention, Australia has an obligation to facilitate the acquisition of, or assist in obtaining, accommodation for diplomatic missions and for their protection.

The Diplomatic Precinct is of special significance to the National Capital and a symbol of Australia’s international cooperation. The National Capital Authority manages Canberra’s diplomatic estate on behalf of the Australian Government.

4.14.3 Objectives for the Diplomatic Precinct (Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley)

  1. Diplomatic missions are established in places which are prestigious, have good access to Parliament House and other designated diplomatic areas, and meet security requirements.
  2. Diplomatic missions are planned and designed to establish a distinct character and setting reflecting their national and international significance.
  3. Diplomatic missions add visual interest and character to the suburb in which they are located.
  4. Buildings and landscaping demonstrate an appreciation of the architectural style and landscape of the surrounding environs while representing the finest architectural thought of the corresponding nation.
  5. Security arrangements required for diplomatic missions are unobtrusive and designed to relate to the surrounding context.

4.14.4 Land use for the Diplomatic Precinct (Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley)

Land use for the Diplomatic Precinct (Yarralumla, Deakin and O’Malley) Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 122 and Figure 123.

Figure 122 - Land use for the Yarralumla and Deakin Diplomatic PrecinctFigure 122: Land use for the Yarralumla and Deakin
Diplomatic
Precinct
Figure 123 - Land use for the O Malley Diplomatic Precinct
Figure
123
: Land use for the O’Malley Diplomatic Precinct

4.14.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

The planning and development of each site should be of a high quality, preferably exhibiting a distinctive design character reflecting the architecture of the country.

Building form and envelope

Large bulky building form is to be avoided. The building by its form should follow the slope of the land, rather than contrasting with it.

The height of any building should not exceed two storeys above natural ground level.

The plot ratio should not exceed 0.35.

Externally exposed plumbing and mechanical plant including duct work will not be permitted. All mechanical plant and equipment should be contained within buildings or service yards and should be suitably screened from public view.

The design, material and colour of building roofs are of particular importance and should be sympathetic with that of surrounding development.

Architectural requirements

All buildings and structures on site are to exhibit a high degree of architectural quality in their design and use of materials. All buildings and structures must also enhance the prestigious setting with substantial landscaped gardens.

Traditional architectural styles are encouraged in the Diplomatic Precinct where buildings contribute to the distinct character of such areas and reflect their national and international significance.

Highly reflective materials for roofs and walls, including mirrored glazing, are not permitted.

Landscape design

Landscape design for individual blocks should seek to enhance the visual quality of the area and integrate the building with its landscape setting.

Landscaping should only be carried out in accordance with a Landscape Plan approved by the National Capital Authority.

Boundary treatment

Boundary fencing should relate to the architectural and landscape design of the diplomatic mission. The character of the architecture should be reflected in the design of the fence and gateway. Chain link, mesh or timber palings will not be accepted. Security fencing should be located inside the boundary treatment.

Car parking

All car parking for staff and visitors should be accommodated wholly within the site.

Car parking areas should be landscaped to minimise their visual impact. The layout of proposed parking areas should be included in the Landscape Plan.

Garages and car ports will not be permitted forward of the building lines established along the frontage of individual blocks. All covered vehicle parking must be consistent in character with the architectural style of the main building, matching materials and finishes.

Plant and equipment

All mechanical plant and equipment (including air conditioning units) should be contained within buildings or located within service enclosures appropriately screened from street frontages.

Security

Perimeter security elements should be incorporated into streetscape or landscape design where possible. Perimeter security elements should be minimised, unobtrusive, and designed to relate to the surrounding context.

Security measures within site boundaries should complement the architecture and landscape design of the mission.


4.15 Main Avenues And Approach Routes Precinct Code

4.15.1 Precinct Location

The Main Avenues covered by this Precinct Code are identified in Figure 124 and the Approach Routes identified in Figure 125.

Figure 124 - Main Avenues locationFigure 124: Main Avenues location

The Main Avenues include the land within the boundaries of the reservations of the following roads:

  • Adelaide Avenue
  • Ainslie Avenue
  • Anzac Parade
  • Brisbane Avenue
  • Canberra Avenue (to Hume Circle)
  • Commonwealth Avenue
  • Constitution Avenue
  • Edinburgh Avenue
  • Hobart Avenue
  • Kings Avenue
  • Limestone Avenue (south of Ainslie Avenue)
  • Melbourne Avenue
  • Northbourne Avenue
  • Perth Avenue
  • State Circle
  • Sydney Avenue
  • University Avenue

The Approach Routes include the land within the boundaries of the reservations of the following roads:

  • Barton Highway
  • Canberra Avenue from Hume Circle to the ACT border
  • Fairbairn Avenue
  • Federal Highway
  • Monaro Highway through to Morshead Drive
  • Morshead Drive/Pialligo Avenue to the ACT border

Figure 125 - Approach Routes locationFigure 125: Approach Routes location

4.15.2 Background

Canberra’s main avenues and approach routes have historically been subject to rigorous planning scrutiny, and care has been taken to ensure that suitably high standards of development and landscaping have been observed.

A traveller’s first perception of a city’s character is gained upon approach and arrival. When arriving in Canberra it is important that the traveller is immediately aware of the special symbolic and functional significance of the National Capital.

Design policies are concerned with achieving awareness of this special significance through the following:

  • marking the boundary of the ACT
  • establishing a clear and identifiable route from the boundary to the symbolic centre of the city, by providing visual cues and strong structural links eg. avenue planting
  • building up expectations by progressively formalising the design character as travellers approach the Central National Area
  • enhancing views to recognisable and popular images of the National Capital so as to further build expectation and define the approach
  • ensuring that the structure, detailing and signage is consistent along each approach route into the National Capital.

To create an identifiable approach, which increases in formality as it gets closer to the Central National Area, and which clearly signifies the symbolic and functional roles of the National Capital:

  • buildings which enhance the approach route function should front these roadways
  • the main avenues are to be enhanced in their formal character and maintained to the highest standards.

Main avenues and approach routes have also previously been identified as ‘Areas of Special National Concern’ in a 1964 Cabinet decision subsequently incorporated in the gazetted planning policies for Canberra. It is important that development within the road reservations, including signs and landscaping continues to be subject to high standards of design and landscaping and continues to recognise the importance of these routes as introductions to the National Capital.

4.15.3 Objectives for Main Avenues and Approach Routes

  1. Establish and enhance the identity of the approaches to the Central National Area as roads of national significance and, where relevant, as frontage roads for buildings which enhance the National Capital function and as corridors for a possible future inter-town public transport system.
  2. Ensure that works within the road reservations are carried out to the highest standards, by maintaining and enhancing landscaping, and by facilitating the flow of traffic as far as possible.
  3. Reinforce and, where possible, express the integrity of the Griffin Plan’s visual structure by strengthening the geometry and form of main avenues, vistas and public spaces.
  4. Improve the urban design and streetscape qualities of the Main Avenues as approaches to the Central National Area.

4.15.4 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

Traffic is to be managed to ensure the continued effective function of the Main Avenues and Approach Routes. The Main Avenues will provide access to fronting buildings where practicable, and where traffic safety and flows are not adversely affected.

Landscaping

The Main Avenues and Approach Routes will be developed and maintained as high quality landscaped corridors. In built-up areas, the established design theme of verges and medians and formal tree plantings will be maintained. In areas of intensive pedestrian use, high quality paving is to be used.

Signs

Signs will generally comprise traffic, directional and visitor information signs, and unnecessary repetition will be avoided. Commercial roadside signs are not permitted in road reservations, except on bus shelters. Non-commercial signs may be permitted where they comply with the requirements for signs set out in the Signs General Code.

Streetscape design

A streetscape hierarchy, that complements the road hierarchy, should be established. This hierarchy should give primacy to main avenues, emphasise continuity along their length through avenues of appropriately scaled trees, consistent pedestrian pavement materials, street furniture and lighting.

Development should generally be constructed to the street boundary to define and enclose streets and create continuous street frontage while allowing variations in individual buildings and uses.

A limited palette of high quality pedestrian pavement materials, street furniture and lighting will be used. Pavement and landscape design should have an elegant, simple and bold design emphasising the geometry and formality of the main avenues.

Streetscapes are to be well lit for pedestrians and optimise security and safety for night time use.

Approach Route – Federal Highway

Location

Development within the Federal Highway Approach Route from its intersection with Stirling Avenue to the ACT border is to comply with the detailed conditions.

Objectives

The objective is to heighten the traveller’s first perception of approach and arrival in order to enhance recognition of the special symbolic and functional significance of the National Capital. These detailed conditions are concerned with achieving awareness of this special significance through the following:

  • marking the boundary of the ACT
  • establishing a clear and identifiable route from the border to the Central National Area, the symbolic centre of the city, by providing visual cues and strong structural links
  • building up expectations by progressively formalising the design character as travellers approach the Central National Area
  • enhancing views to recognisable and popular images of the National Capital so as to further build expectation and define the approach

ensuring that the structure, detailing and signage is consistent along each approach route into the National Capital.

Policies

Border Identification and Marker

Ensure the identification of the ACT by the placement of a marker at a safe and appropriate location, possibly in conjunction with a visitor lay-by. The marker should be similar in form and design to the existing marker but should also include heraldic features which signify the symbolic and functional role of the city and which establishes a relationship to signs and institutions in the Parliamentary Zone. There should be clear lateral views to the border marker; and

Introduce specialty lighting to highlight the ACT marker. If practical, up-lighting of the border marker and adjacent tree canopy should be used.

Figure 126 - Federal Highway road design characteristicsFigure 126: Federal Highway road design characteristics

Road Design Characteristics

Access Limitations

From Antill Street to the intersection with the realigned Majura Road, access will not be permitted on the southern side of the highway except to Apex Park. From the intersection with the realigned Majura Road to the ACT border, no access will be permitted except to a visitor lay-by.

On the northern side of the Federal Highway, access will be permitted only in the short term to ‘Arnold Grove’, ‘Bendora Riding School’, the AGL lease, and ‘Canberra Park’ while longer term access is expected to be provided from within Gungahlin.

Intersection Design

The continuity of the north/south carriageway driver experience should be reinforced. The Majura Road/Horse Park Drive grade separated intersection should reinforce the visual dominance of the Federal Highway, to maximise views and ensure the least disruption to the landform.

Medians and Verges

Medians and verges are to provide the opportunity for reinforcement of landscape themes and realms. Medians should be of a sufficient width to accommodate the appropriate landscape treatments for each landscape realm and pattern and generally be not less than 20 metres wide.

Carriageways

Roadworks are to minimise the impact on the existing topography. Cuts and fills associated with the design and construction of the highway and associated roadworks are to be kept to a minimum. The highway is to be designed to ‘fit’ within the landscape and topography.

Where possible, the two carriageways are to be designed independently and separated both vertically and horizontally so as to ensure integration into the topography.

Road surfaces should be of asphaltic concrete with a clean edge, unless other materials are shown to be more appropriate.

Lighting

Where provided, lighting should reinforce the design intent of the Federal Highway as a ‘rural’ highway road. Further, the colour temperature of the lights should be such that the true colours and features of the landscape are perceived. Light spillage is to be minimised to prevent unnecessary night sky illumination.

Equestrian Trails

Ensure the design of the highway incorporates appropriately located and connected underpasses for equestrian use and facilitates the continuation of existing equestrian trails; and

Enhance where possible, the trail concept with provisions for additional facilities at appropriate locations.

Signs

Ensure informative, well presented, factually correct and relevant visitor information is displayed on signs and boards and plays a key role in informing the visitor.

Ensure information signage conforms to a uniform standard for Approach Routes. All signs which are not essential to be read from the road, such as interest group signs, are to be located in a visitor lay-by.

Information appropriate for inclusion in visitor lay-by signage includes:

  • natural landscape – environment information regarding the distinctive natural landscape and features
  • cultural/historical landscape – information regarding Aboriginal history and influences and early European settlement and impact
  • siting of Canberra – diagrammatic development of Canberra, basic structure of Canberra’s layout including important features and elements, monuments and institutions
  • community organisations and relevant local information.

Visitor directional signage, other than in the visitor lay-by, will be permitted where shown on Figure 126 assist identification of destinations between Antill Street and Stirling Avenue, Watson.

No other visitor information signs will be permitted along the highway.

Visitor Lay-By

Ensure access to a visitor lay-by at a convenient location for visitors.

Landscape

General

The policy is:

  • to ensure Canberra’s unique setting within the natural landscape is reflected in the sensitive design and landscape treatment for the highway which reinforces the perception of the National Capital
  • to recognise the significance of views to the surrounding hills and ensure engineering structures respect the landform and landscape patterns.

Figure 127 - Federal Highway landscape realms and patternsFigure 127: Federal Highway landscape realms and patterns

Major Landscape Realms

The Federal Highway is divided into two broad realms for the purposes of detailing landscape patterns. They are a Rural Realm and an Open Parkland Realm (see Figure 127 ‘Federal Highway landscape realms and patterns).

  • Rural Realm: identifies the location of Canberra and establishes the setting of the ‘bush capital’. The pastoral setting is a cultural and historical reminder and recognises that the colour and scale of the landscape are important in creating an identifiable and memorable image. Views to the Gungahlin ranges and Black Mountain should be maintained and enhanced.
  • Open Parkland Realm: emphasises reflection of the rural landscape, (but with a designed park-like landscape quality), and introduces the visitor to the planned ‘garden city’ image. Planting and development patterns are to allow filtered horizontal views.

Landscape Patterns

Driver experience should be modulated through a series of distinct landscape patterns which identifies a change in landscape character from an informal planting, open, rolling, rural landscape to a regular planted, closed, dense canopy pattern of the semi-urban landscape. Landscape patterns apply as set out in Figure 127.

To assist the understanding of the landscape patterns and where they apply, the highway has been broken into sections starting at the ACT border.

  • Plantation Gateway (0.0–0.4 km): creates an introduction and announces the imminent arrival of the visitor in Canberra by establishing appropriately designed tree planting that relates to the rural landscape, but is distinct in character. Within the road reserve, the policy is to develop a formal plantation in the verge and median of the highway.
  • Savannah Woodland (0.4–0.8 km): reinforces the existing woodland character by maintaining and enhancing the indigenous eucalypts in small groups and individual specimens in the median and verges, and ensures the character is of an open canopy giving a parkland appearance.
  • Tussock Grassland (0.8–1.4 km): establishes a grassland community and complements the savannah woodland character of adjacent sections of the highway. It does this through broad scale planting of road verges with native grasses and herbaceous plants with low grasses in medians.
  • Savannah Woodland (1.4–2.8 km): reinforces the rural pastoral character by planting and protecting indigenous eucalypts in small groups and individual specimens in the median and verges, generally widely spaced, leaving an open canopy and giving a parkland appearance. Residential views are to be screened and views opened up along open space corridors.
  • Open Forest/Woodland (2.8–4.0 km): reinforces the open forest character of this part of the highway. The policy is to resolve secondary access to rural properties while maintaining continuity of the approach route, and to allow short, filtered horizontal views. Median planting is to be informal and should reinforce existing native planting as well as introducing grouped accent planting.
  • Filtered Semi-Urban (4.0–5.4 km): creates a transition from woodland to the contrasting closed corridor section of Northbourne Avenue and develops a ‘secondary’ gateway with designed avenue planting to create a strong contrast with the rural landscape as the introduction to urban Canberra. Direct views should focus along the approach route. The built form should be screened through the use of plant material.

Cultural Landscape Features

The policy is to maintain the significance of the Remembrance Parks through enhancement of their location and access in association with a visitor lay-by, by providing interpretative material, and by the possible extension of areas for planting.


4.16 Australian Institute Of Sport Precinct Code

4.16.1 Precinct location

The Australian Sports Commission (ASC) is commonly referred to as the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS). The AIS is located in the suburb of Bruce in the ACT. The campus consists of approximately 75 hectares and is bound to the north and east by Masterman Street, to the west by Braybrooke Street, and to the south by Battye Street and the hills and ridges that abut Gungahlin Drive.

Figure 128 - Australian Institute of Sport Precinct locationFigure 128: Australian Institute of Sport Precinct location

4.16.2 Background

The ASC is the Australian Government’s leading sport agency that develops, supports and invests in sport at all levels. The AIS campus creates and maintains the physical environment that supports the ASC’s objectives to make Australian sport stronger – to get more people playing sport and to help athletes pursue their dreams.

4.16.3 Objectives for Australian Institute of Sport Precinct

The framework that has been formulated by the AIS as part of a wider master planning process includes the following planning themes:

Sporting intent

The planning and design policies of the AIS Bruce campus provide a place that actively facilitates world leading outcomes for high performance sport and greater participation in sport for the wider community. The campus must be planned, built and maintained in a manner that enhances the AIS’s leadership of sport.

Functional elements

The AIS campus enables the delivery of activities consistent with the Australian Sports Commission Act 1989 and provides a range of land uses that support the AIS's sporting intent. This includes the following sport related functions:

  • Daily training environment for high performance sport
  • Research and Innovation
  • Scientific capability and support services
  • Learning
  • Residential accommodation
  • Commercialisation including events
  • Administration
  • Site infrastructure
  • Support services
  • Community activities.

Infrastructure

Management of the campus includes the provision and maintenance of appropriate infrastructure to support the functional requirements of the campus with capacity and flexibility for future growth including the provision of the following:

  • Environmentally sustainable landscaping, reflecting contemporary design and environmental standards
  • Energy efficient utilities
  • Communication systems
  • Safety elements such as security, lighting, and wayfinding
  • Roadways, footpaths and hardstandings.

Built form

Planning allows for an attractive, welcoming campus that complements and enhances the natural landscape and integrates the essential elements for sporting and support facilities in the built environment.

Landscape

The Landscape Masterplan must be prepared that expresses the national sporting endeavour and achievement through a positive use of contemporary Australian design. It should incorporate a palette of native and exotic plantings, maintaining key open spaces and corridors, water capture and reuse, dry grasslands and shrubs. Any building development proposals will incorporate the key hard and soft landscape design elements.

Transport and movement

The campus is integrated into the adjoining road infrastructure to ensure safe egress and car parking for athletes, staff and visitors. The campus Traffic Impact Assessment informs traffic flow and parking in addition to strengthening the use of public transport and cycling and reducing bicycle/vehicle/pedestrian conflicts.

Sustainability

The AIS campus will be developed and managed in a way that ensures high standards of environmental sustainability and social inclusion with campus environmental management based on the international standards for environmental management systems.

Heritage

The AIS’ capability to identify and manage its buildings and artefacts of cultural and potential heritage value will be enhanced. Any new development will be integrated sympathetically within the campus to enhance the overall environment, commensurate with the endorsed ASC Heritage Strategy.

4.16.4 Land use for Australian Institute of Sport Precinct

Land use for the Australian Institute of Sport Precinct should be in accordance with Figure 129.

 
Figure 129: Land use for the Australian Institute of Sport Precinct

Land use on the AIS campus is predominantly National Capital Use which is principally focussed on providing for high performance sporting activity and supporting services, including administration and residential accommodation. In addition, commercial and entertainment facilities, open space, roads, pathways and parking areas are permitted.

Figure 129 - Land use for the Australian Institute of Sport Precinct

Figure 129: Land use for the Australian Institute of Sport Precinct

4.16.5 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

General

Broadly, planning and design of the AIS Bruce campus will:

  • Provide a consistent urban design character which expresses national sporting endeavour, achievement and lifestyles through a positive use of contemporary Australian design, which is innovative, cost effective and energy efficient.
  • Ensure a continuity of a campus style development of individual pavilion type buildings based mainly on orthogonal plan form geometry aligned with the north-north-east orientation of the Main Pedestrian Spine. Variations in this site planning and built form geometry may be approved to meet specific functional needs, subject to overall compliance with the detailed conditions of planning, design and development of this Precinct Code.
  • Functional relationship between uses must be considered while siting buildings/facilities on the site and should be in accordance with the ‘Specific’ detailed conditions of planning, design and development of this Precinct Code. Figure 130 shows the spatial relationship among various uses/facilities in the core area of the AIS and provides guidelines for possible new development or development extensions within the area.
Sporting intent

The development of the AIS Bruce campus will reflect the emerging needs of our national sporting organisations, peak national sporting bodies, state institutes and academies of sport, Federal and State sporting departments and the sport business sector. In achieving this, the AIS facilities will be recognised as world-class Centres of Excellence.

Building Design, Materials and Colour

Buildings should correspond to the architectural language of existing adjacent development for their external expression in terms of choice of materials, detailing, construction logic, structural expression and scale of elements. Some variation in the architectural design may be considered - especially where the design expresses the specific function of the building, but such variation should be within the limits of an overall consistency.

Wherever possible, external building materials should adhere to the existing range of types, finishes and colours, in order to encourage visual coherence between buildings. Sympathetic variations in colours and materials between individual buildings may be considered. However, strongly defined contrasts in colour of architectural features should generally be avoided.

Within these parameters, more prominent design and colour treatment may be considered for special facilities (such as visitor arrival, reception, exhibition, display and signage facilities) where increased visual emphasis is integral to their function.

All external façades must be of high quality durable low maintenance materials. Highly reflective external materials should not be used.

Landscape design

Landscaping of the site should be in accordance with a comprehensive landscape plan prepared for the site which aims to ensure the following:

  • Consistency in the site landscape design should be maintained.
  • Wherever possible significant existing vegetation should be retained and blended with the landscape design. Care should be taken during construction to protect the trees to be retained.
  • Landscaping should provide screens, as appropriate, against the large masses of buildings and paved areas to minimise their visual impact on the adjacent areas, and especially the open spaces.
  • External paving materials, fencing, screening, lighting and related outdoor furniture should ensure visual coherence and consistency over the entire site.
Traffic Circulation and Parking Provision

Provisions for vehicular access/egress and parking accommodation should be made in accordance with the requirements of the National Capital Authority after consideration of relevant ACT Government standards. In this regard, the traffic impacts of new development or development extensions in the area must be taken into consideration.

A Traffic Management Plan should be prepared for the AIS in accordance with the relevant ACT Government standards and must be agreed to by relevant ACT authorities. The plan should address management issues related to possible conflicts in traffic circulation of different kinds of traffic (vehicular, pedestrian and service vehicle) and the provision and management of car parking within and adjacent to the AIS.

Pedestrian links between various facilities should be ensured and expanded, connecting on site facilities, carparking areas and transport access points with the primary destinations, including the Stadia, Visitor Centre and Main Administration Zone.

The existing main pedestrian spine should play an increased role in the pedestrian network of the campus and its expansion over time. Detailing of the pedestrian spine should generally be in accordance with Figure 132.

Environmental Considerations

Adverse environmental impacts from on-site developments, on adjacent land and development, should be identified and redressed to the fullest extent practicable in accordance with the requirements of the National Capital Authority after consideration of relevant ACT Government standards.

Temporary/Short Term Uses

The design, materials and colours of temporary buildings should be sympathetic to the surrounding buildings and the landscape and must ensure some level of consistency with adjacent development in terms of detailing and the colour treatment.

Lighting

Where practicable, all outdoor lighting, including security and car park lighting must be designed and sited to minimise light pollution. Outdoor lighting must use full cut-off light fittings. Any up-lighting of buildings should be carefully designed to keep night time overspill and glare to a minimum.

Specific

The area covered by this Precinct Code has been divided into five distinct precincts. Precincts 3, 4 and 5 have been further divided into two zones each as shown in Figure 131. The precinct and zone specific requirements/controls are given below.

PRECINCT 1: Main Entry and Administration

Purpose and general characteristics

The purpose of this precinct is to accommodate the central administration and formal public arrival and visitor functions of the AIS in a distinctive manner that is appropriate to the National status and functions of the Institute.

This precinct is characterised as the main public address and administrative centre for the Campus and is geographically central to existing AIS built facilities. Its function is reflected in the character of the existing building, landscaping, external works and direct links to adjacent door facilities.

This precinct is related most directly to adjacent indoor sports facilities and the temporary administration annex located on the main pedestrian spine.

Development within the precinct should incorporate vehicular arrival, covered setdown and limited visitor parking and also include appropriate landscaping, urban furniture, artworks and signage. Vehicular access through the area should be restricted and most parking, apart from short stay visitor parking, should be provided outside the precinct.

Building Character

The existing character and scale of buildings within the precinct should generally be maintained. However, localised height increases may be considered to allow added locational emphasis for the entry areas. Existing setbacks from Leverrier Street and the Main Pedestrian Spine are to be maintained.

Buildings within this precinct should be limited to a maximum of three storeys or 12 metres to parapet or eaves level, in order to maintain scale with existing development. The frontages with Leverrier Street and the main pedestrian spine should have a maximum height of two storeys or 8.5 metres to maximise winter sun penetration to the spine.

Landscape Character

To complement the scale of development, a strong structure planting framework should be considered for Leverrier Street; with more detailed planting focusing on building entry, public arrival and assembly-areas. Structure planting, street and avenue planting should be predominantly native species to reflect National landscape content and the existing Eucalyptus planting in portions of Leverrier Street.

Landscape planting within the precinct should mainly be exotic trees and shrub species with irrigated grass areas, including a majority of deciduous trees to maximise winter sun penetration.

Precinct 2: Residential Accommodation

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this precinct is to accommodate all on site AIS residential needs in an attractive and secure living environment, separate from training and event facilities and general public areas. The needs include housing for resident and visiting athletes and staff, as well as related residential facilities for external training, education, exchange, visitor and event programs.

This precinct is characterised as the main accommodation area for the Campus and the centre of social and community activity for resident athletes and staff. Dining hall, indoor recreation and concessional uses are conveniently located within the existing four storey development, whose wings form semi enclosed residential ‘courts’. The precinct is directly related to the indoor and outdoor sports facilities to the east and principally accessed via the main pedestrian spine.

Development within the precinct should incorporate housing support uses, including residential reception and administration, resident concessions, library and educational resource facilities. All accommodation should be provided within an integrated three to four storey medium density development that conserves the residential capacity and amenity of the site.

Building Character

The existing residential character and scale of the precinct should be maintained and developed through a series of new residential courts and associated support facilities. Existing setbacks from Leverrier Street and the Main Pedestrian Spine are to be maintained.

New buildings along the eastern Leverrier Street frontage must be sited to align with the existing residential building on that frontage and should hold critical corners with appropriate building mass. Buildings along the Main Pedestrian Spine must address the spine and be sited to define and reinforce the linear pedestrian space as shown in Figure 130.

The detailed face brickwork character of the existing housing should not to be repeated, except for extensions or modifications to the existing blocks. A more contemporary and cost effective design idiom should be considered, while maintaining consistency with the housing type, scale, materials and colour.

Buildings within this precinct should be limited to a maximum of four storeys in order to maintain the scale of existing housing and retain the residential capacity of the site. Adjoining the main pedestrian spine, a maximum height of three storeys needs to be maintained. An average height of three to four storeys is required across the area.

New buildings along the western frontage of Leverrier Street should be sited to complement the existing residential buildings on the eastern frontage, present appropriate building mass and assist with noise reduction in the vicinity of residential accommodation areas.

Landscape Character

The external landscape character of the zone is determined largely by its extended frontages with the Main Pedestrian Spine and Leverrier Street, both of which should be developed as fully landscaped informal malls.

To complement the scale of the residential courts and sports halls, a strong structure planting framework should be provided for Leverrier Street and the Pedestrian Spine, with more detailed planting focusing on building entry, public arrival and assembly areas.

Landscapes within the residential courts should focus on passive outdoor uses and residential amenity, with a predominance of deciduous tree planting to maximise winter sun penetration.

Native tree and shrub planting, with dryland grass should be considered for Leverrier Street, to maintain its existing landscape character, while the Pedestrian Spine and Residential arrival zone are to be principally exotic tree and shrub species with irrigated grass areas.

Precinct 3: Main Indoor Facilities

3A. Indoor Arena Zone - South

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this zone is to provide for major indoor sporting and entertainment venues involving large public attendances and requiring associated public facilities. These venues include the main indoor stadium and various sports halls.

This zone is almost fully developed and generally characterised by large wide span structures in an open landscape setting. This area is the main focus of public involvement in AIS indoor facilities. The zone relates most directly to the adjacent indoor and outdoor facilities of zones 3B and 4A, and the main parking areas west of Leverrier Street. Internal pedestrian access is principally via the central pedestrian spine.

Building Character

New development within this zone should generally seek to retain the character to existing facilities and be part of an integrated building and landscape group. Alterations and additions to existing structures should closely adhere to the design intent of the original, including form, materials and colours. It should allow the existing main structures ‘pavilion’ character to be maintained in all views, particularly from Leverrier Street. Within this general context, any new facility must have a distinctive design and siting approach either as a complementary secondary element for existing prominent structures or as a separate pavilion, where such visual prominence is justified by function or scale.

The buildings within this zone share an orthogonal relationship to each other and Leverrier Street and constitute a well balanced group within a carefully designed landscape setting. This relationship between the buildings and landscaping should generally be maintained for all new development within the zone.

Apart from the Indoor Stadium, the buildings are mainly two to three storeys in height but differ markedly in scale due to extensive earth mounding, part basements and elevated roof structures. Generally, new development should not exceed the height of adjacent facilities within the zone.

Landscape Character

The landscape character of the zone is predominantly open grassed areas, mounding and paving, which allow open views between facilities and serve as a foil to the large scale sculptural quality of the major Sports Halls. This landscape character and visibility is important for visitor and tourist activities and should be retained in new development, subject to screening and micro-climate needs of building entry, parking, service areas and pedestrian links.

3B. Indoor Facilities Zone - East

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this zone is to provide comprehensive indoor training, practice and competition facilities for the AIS, together with associated Sports Science, Medicine, Seminar and support facilities. The main AIS Services Centre is also located in this zone.

This zone is extensively developed with few significant vacant sites remaining. The zone is characterised by a mix of large sports halls and support buildings, with relatively contained outdoor landscape areas. The zone is an integral part of the main pedestrian spine and its buildings should consistently maintain a high design standard.

This zone extends full length of the pedestrian spine. It houses a wide range of sports and has active links with most on site facilities. It is strongly related to the outdoor training facilities zone 4B, which provides close support for related indoor activities. Vehicular and service access is provided from the north and west, however, all general access is via the pedestrian spine. This access arrangement should be maintained for new development within the zone.

Building Character

Buildings within the zone are mainly of two to three storey height, but differ markedly in scale due to attached structures and architectural modelling. New development should not exceed the height of adjacent facilities, except where localised height adjustment is necessary to accommodate special design requirements.

New development should be similar in character to existing facilities and be part of an integrated building and landscape group. Alterations or additions to existing structures must closely adhere to the design intent of the original, including form, materials and colours.

New buildings should have a distinctive siting and design approach that defines and reinforces the new pedestrian plaza connecting the existing and the northern extension of the Main Pedestrian Spine. Existing building height and open space relationships are important for outdoor amenity in this area and will require detailed consideration in any new building works.

Landscape Character

The landscape character of the zone stems from its contained pedestrian environment, continuous interface with the pedestrian spine and a diverse mix of semi mature exotic tree and shrub planting. This existing character of landscaping should be maintained and enhanced for new developments in the zone.

Local stormwater drainage, service access and road work changes for future extension of the zone (to the north) should ensure integration with the Pedestrian Spine and cycleway landscape. An integrated landscape planting strategy should be considered for this zone and the (extended) pedestrian spine as a whole.

Precinct 4: Main Outdoor Facilities
4A. Outdoor Stadium and Athletics Zone

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this zone is to:

  • provide a major outdoor stadium to accommodate large sporting and spectator events
  • provide the main outdoor training and competition venue for AIS track and fields sports
  • accommodate related public assembly, crowd control, transport and parking facilities
  • allow for expanded spectator capacity to house exceptional demands from unique events
  • allow for progressive upgrading of athlete, spectator and media facilities.

The zone is characterised by the large earth formed amphitheatre and main grandstand of the stadium, with its associated lighting towers, ticketing booths, electronic score board and crowd assembly areas. Extensive landscape mounding and planting surrounding the stadium provide a suitable landscape transition with adjacent areas. The athletics area to the south is characterised by relatively modest scale support facilities. The area is most closely related to adjacent spectator access and parking areas, including general parking off Battye and Leverrier Streets and unsealed overflow parking areas to the east.

Careful management is required to ensure design coordination of miscellaneous structures, outbuildings and storage, and also a unified and cohesive landscape framework for the zone.

Building Character

The main buildings and grandstand of the stadium have a dominant structural character and are well integrated with secondary facilities despite a significant difference in scale. The complex relates well to the adjacent Indoor Stadium which employs similar materials, earth mounding and cable supported structure.

The main buildings are visually removed from the adjacent stadia facilities and quite different in character and style. This character should be reflected in any upgrading or new facilities development works. The number of secondary structures/facilities should be limited and grouped wherever possible to minimise their impact on the architecture and landscape of the main facilities. Such support facilities should be integrated with the main stadium or its extensions and the surrounding landscape through appropriate architectural and landscape solutions.

Apart from the main stadium structures, most buildings are and should be limited to single storey. Special consideration should be given to special use structures, such as viewing, judging and media coverage towers, lighting towers, scoreboards and the like, which exceed this limit or may be obtrusively sited in prominent locations.

Landscape Character

The landscape character of this zone is strongly influenced by the scale of the stadium facility and extensive native planting in the main approach from the west. Perimeter planting should be considered to provide a more coherent landscape structure consistent with surrounding bushland.

4B. Outdoor Training Facilities Zone - East

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this zone is to allow for intensive outdoor training in close support with the adjoining indoor sports halls (to the west) and to accommodate operational and support facilities required for intensive usage programs.

The area is most closely related to the indoor facilities zone 3B and is characterised by hard surfaced team and field sport enclosures, incorporating diverse training, spectator, shelter, storage and maintenance facilities. Minor facilities may be considered in this zone, provided the outdoor amenity of adjoining uses is not impaired. Careful management is required to ensure design coordination of miscellaneous structures, outbuildings and storage, and to implement a unified and cohesive landscape framework.

Building Character

The area is generally limited to small single storey support facilities. The number of structures should be limited and grouped, wherever possible, to minimise their impact in the landscape. Buildings or other structures should be integrated with the landscape by the use of levels, banks, landscape screens and tree planting.

All buildings or structures should be limited to one storey or a maximum height of 3.5 metres above finished ground level. Special consideration needs to be given to special use structures, such as viewing and judging towers, sight board and safety net enclosures, which exceed this limit. Where possible, the siting of obtrusive structures should avoid visually prominent locations and obstruction of adjacent facilities.

Landscape Character

The landscape character of this zone is strongly influenced by hard landscape elements and limited opportunity for larger scale planting and screening between facilities. Perimeter planting should to be extended to provide a more coherent landscape structure, improved screening and microclimate conditions.

Precinct 5: Eastern Support and Parking Areas
5A. Playing and Practice Fields Zone

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this zone is to provide for the majority of more space extensive outdoor practice and training activities. The zone allows for expansion of more intensive outdoor training facilities related to Activity Zones 3B, 4A and 4B. It may also allow for overflow temporary parking associated with major events in AIS.

Building Character

The area should be maintained as an open landscape area with limited single storey low key support facilities carefully designed and sited within the landscape setting. Support structures will need to be grouped wherever possible to minimise visual impact on the landscape. All buildings/structures should be integrated into the landscape by the use of levels, banks, landscape screens and tree planting.

Landscape Character

The landscape character of this zone should be established through tree planting generally in extended groups to meet wind break and visual backdrop requirements of the practice areas.

5B. Parking Zone - East

Purpose and General Characteristics

The purpose of this zone is to provide for peak car and bus parking in relation to major spectator events.

The area is characterised by unsealed grassed surface used for intensive but generally intermittent event parking.

Building Character

Generally no buildings or support structures are to be considered in this zone and the area to be used solely for parking. Minor support structures, if considered, should be carefully designed and sited avoiding visually prominent locations and ensuring that they have minimum visual impact on the landscape setting.

Landscape Character

The landscape character of this zone should be maintained with additional landscaping to be considered for providing screening, visual containment and wind protection, and to better relate to the adjacent O'Connor Ridge Nature Park. Tree planting generally needs to be in extended groups to meet windbreak and enclosure requirements. More open groupings are also required to relieve the expanse of the parking areas and to provide a landscape transition consistent with the surrounding native vegetation.

Figure 130 - Australian Institute of Sport - Spatial definition and guidelinesFigure 130: Australian Institute of Sport – Spatial definition and guidelines
Figure 131 - Australian Institute of Sport - Precinct PlanFigure 131: Australian Institute of Sport
Precinct
Plan
Figure 132 - Australian Institute of Sport - Pedestrian Spine Figure 132: Australian Institute of Sport – Pedestrian Spine


4.17 Australian National University Precinct Code

4.17.1 Precinct location

The campus of the Australian National University at Acton is located on a large area of land in Central Canberra, within the National Central Area. The campus is located on the western edge of the city centre and is bound to the south by Lake Burley Griffin and Parkes Way, to the west by Clunies Ross Street and Black Mountain, and to the north by Barry Drive and the residential area of Turner.

Figure 133 illustrates the location of the Australian National University Precinct.

Figure 133 - Australian National University Precinct locationFigure 133: Australian National University Precinct location

4.17.2 Objectives for the Australian National University Precinct

The ANU’s vision is to be Australia’s finest university.

The Acton campus creates and maintains the physical environment that supports the University’s overall vision and to provide for ‘a great University set in a delightful campus’. The objectives that have been formulated by the University as part of a wider master planning process are identified under the following planning themes:

Academic intent

Ensure the campus is planned, built and maintained in a manner that enhances the University’s academic endeavours. The primary role of the campus is to provide a place that actively facilitates world leading research and education.

Functional elements

Ensure a range of compatible land uses that address the University’s needs for academic research, teaching, student accommodation and services, open space, parking, road access and cultural activity. The land use pattern is one of mixed-uses supporting the principal centred on an academic theme, but permitting a range of ancillary or associated activities on campus that serve this core land use.

Campus structure

The Acton campus has developed a number of distinct local areas with their own character and values. These are linked by several unifying landscaped corridors, walkways and waterway such as University Avenue, Acton Ridge Walk and Sullivans Creek. The objective is to reinforce these unifying elements as well as enhance the different characteristics of individual areas on campus through landscaping and building style. A related objective is to integrate the campus with the city centre.

Built form

Retain the ‘building in a landscape’ character of the campus, but recognise the need for some taller buildings in selected locations to facilitate growth in university floor space without loss of important green spaces and heritage places.

Heritage

Conserve, enhance and interpret the heritage values of the campus in the context of a modern, dynamic research and teaching campus.

Landscape

Retain the ‘building in a landscape’ character of the campus, through protection of the landscape setting and the three major ‘landscape axes’: University Avenue, Sullivans Creek and the Acton Ridge.

Transport and movement

Encourage walking, cycling and public transport as preferred ways of arriving and moving through the campus. Further develop the network of dedicated pathways, and relocate surface car parking from central areas to peripheral multi-level car parks.

Infrastructure

Ensure the campus is adequately serviced with a range of well maintained, appropriate infrastructure.

A living campus

  1. Create a safe and attractive campus with on-site student residential accommodation being a significant component of the educational experience.
  2. Ensure a diverse range of accommodation along with a range of other social, retail, commercial, sporting, entertainment and cultural facilities providing for different life stages in order to maintain a diverse and vibrant community.
  3. Ensure there is an attractive and convenient wayfinding system for visitors to campus.

Sustainability

Ensure the campus is developed and managed in a way that ensures high standards of environmental sustainability, and that the campus is also seen as part of wider environmental sustainability initiatives in adjacent areas.

4.17.3 Land use for the Australian National University Precinct

Land use on the Acton campus will be dominated by academic activity, supported by a range of ancillary uses including university related administration, open space, residential accommodation for students and researchers, commercial accommodation for University visitors, cultural and entertainment facilities, personal, retail and commercial services to meet daily needs of the campus population, as well as roads, pathways and parking areas.

Figure 134 illustrates the permitted land use for the Australian National University Precinct.

Figure 134 - Land use for the Australian National University PrecinctFigure 134: Land use for the Australian National University Precinct

4.17.4 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

The following principles are provided to assist with decisions about future development on the campus. They provide a ‘high level’ guide to future development and will inform more detailed local area master plans and other campus wide policies (for example, parking and signage) that will be prepared by the University.

Academic intent

  1. Development should incorporate design solutions that address emerging trends in education and delivery of academic services, including improved physical linkages between research, learning and other centres.
  2. All buildings should have clearly identifiable frontages.
  3. Co-location of related functions will be a primary consideration for siting of new development.

Functional elements

  1. New buildings must improve functional connections, operational efficiency and access for students, staff and the community within precincts and connect to surrounding networks.
  2. New buildings and major building refurbishments whose primary use is requires active frontages must be designed to provide a welcoming and lively community experience.
  3. Development proposals must demonstrate that the design and siting will enliven the campus and its sense of identity, and improve spatial qualities and environmental values.

Campus structure

  1. Siting of new development should create strong linkages, both physical and visual, with the City Centre, CSIRO, Australian National Botanic Gardens, Black Mountain, Lake Burley Griffin and Acton Peninsula.
  2. New development should enhance and activate the campus structure as set out in Figure 135 through the establishment and/or reinforcement of gateways and entrances, movement networks (roads, pathways and shared zones), edges, knowledge clusters and hubs, and key public and ceremonial spaces.
  3. Core activities of the university, such as teaching and learning spaces, libraries and major venues are to be located to concentrate activity along main pedestrian paths to provide safe access by day and night.
  4. Building design must address perimeter streets with active frontages and provide strong connections and linkages to surrounding areas and networks.
  5. Significant development is not permitted within the restricted development zones identified in Figure 136.
  6. The exact boundary of the hatched development area in Figure 136 along University Avenue between Sullivan’s Creek and Childers Avenue will be determined through a separate masterplan process. A student gathering space is to be retained in the precinct.
  7. Some structures, such as signage, paths, lighting, a grandstand in conjunction with a sporting oval, may be permitted in the nominated restricted development zones provided it is considered to be ancillary to and compatible with the main purpose of the area.
  8. Any development within the restricted development zones must not significantly adversely impact on the landscape, environmental and heritage values of the campus.

Figure 135 - Australian National University - Campus structureFigure 135: Australian National University - 
Campus
structure
Figure
Figure 136 - Australian National University - Restricted Development Zones 136: Australian National University - Restricted Development Zones

Built form and height

  1. Building form should be configured with a high resolution of the overall design and the design details, and use enduring and enriching building materials.
  2. Building design must respect and contribute positively to the landscape setting of the campus.
  3. Building edges are to address and define external open spaces to enclose courtyards and overlook movement corridors.
  4. Buildings should be orientated to allow maximum solar access.
  5. All new development should incorporate design elements to achieve a high standard of sustainability, biodiversity, green recreation, and open space.
  6. Building heights are to be in accordance with Figure 137. Where a height range is provided, suggests indicative permitted height limits (for example, a height limit of 4-6 storeys requires development to be where possible a minimum of four storeys and a maximum of six storeys). Some discretion is permitted where funding for new works from bequest or other sources are not sufficient to achieve the desired height range.
  7. Built form along key walkways such as University Avenue must ensure that adequate sunlight is available for pedestrian and cyclist movement and should limit overshadowing, especially during mid-winter mid-day period.
  8. Buildings along Clunies Ross Street must not be designed to create a continuous wall of development, but must be separated and orientated to permit views into and from the campus, and variable in height to create visual interest and gateway markers.
  9. Where taller buildings are located to provided gateway elements or visual markers, there should be no loss of pedestrian amenity in public spaces.
  10. Buildings adjacent to heritage places must reflect, respect and interpret the character of the heritage place.
  11. Buildings along Liversidge Street are to be configured to protect the landscape character of the campus as seen from important vantage points at ground level, such as Commonwealth Avenue Bridge.

Figure 137 - Australian National University - Indicative building heightsFigure 137: Australian National University - Indicative building heights

Heritage

  1. The design of new buildings will respond to the heritage context, in terms of landscape setting, bulk, form, scale, colour, texture and materials. Architectural imitation will be avoided and new work will be readily identifiable as such, but contextually respectful.
  2. Where a proposal has the potential to affect a heritage place or the Acton Conservation Area as identified on Figure 138, a Heritage Impact Assessment should be undertaken to identify possible impacts upon heritage values of a place and recommend mitigation measures.
  3. New development must be integrated sensitively within the campus and enhance important natural and developed features.

Figure 138 - Australian National University - Heritage itemsFigure 138: Australian National University - Heritage items

Landscape

  1. The overall natural and open landscape setting of the campus is to remain the major defining element. Development proposals must demonstrate that the building design achieves this aim.
  2. Landscape design for the spaces surrounding buildings should be compatible with the character of the immediate precinct. Landscape design should frame legible pedestrian linkages and attractive spaces between buildings.
  3. Landscaping for new development near Sullivans Creek will reinforce its significance as a green spine through the campus and enhance the biodiversity and visual character of the creek line.
  4. Key open spaces and landscaped corridors are to be retained without significant development to protect their role as important open space ‘lungs’ and habitat areas on campus. The landscape character around the periphery of the campus, which provides a distinctive sense of place that announces the University, is to be retained and reinstated as part of any planning and construction for new development.
  5. Proposed landscaping must reflect the intended landscape structure for the university as shown in Figure 136.

Transport and movement

  1. New development must accommodate circulation systems to ensure that campus users can move safely about the campus, with priority given to pedestrians, cyclists and public transport access.
  2. All new development will address parking generated by the development as well as any parking spaces removed by the development.
  3. Extra provision of cycle lockup facilities will be required to support development that removes existing parking spaces.
  4. Design measures are to be adopted which separate different traffic modes providing safe and consistent surface standards where the pavement width clearly identifies the function and hierarchy of the path/road.
  5. New roads and road upgrades are to integrate with adjacent landscape areas by including design measures such as swales rather than hard-edge kerbs and gutters.
  6. Principal, Major and Minor Entries to the campus are to be well defined, and internal connections are to be legible and accessible.

Infrastructure

  1. New and upgraded physical infrastructure including utility and communication services must be provided on campus to meet improved service standards and changing user requirements.
  2. Street lighting must be designed and sited to improve pedestrian, bicycle and vehicle safety on campus, and avoid increased light pollution.
  3. General campus lighting must provide aesthetic interest and accentuate key structural elements of the campus (for example, University Avenue). New buildings are to make provision to support solar and wind generation systems, and incorporate efficient energy and water systems. Roof-top solar and wind generation systems are permitted.

A living campus

  1. New residential development is permitted on campus to increase levels of activation.
  2. Where possible and appropriate, the new student accommodation will be accompanied by a range of personal, commercial and safe outdoor spaces at ground level of these buildings.
  3. New development must incorporate Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles to encourage a campus that is safe, secure and welcoming for all users and visitors day and night.
  4. New development must incorporate design measures which recognise the value of existing cultural facilities and social spaces.
  5. New development involving health, social welfare, child care and student services facilities is to be sited in the core areas of the campus in close proximity to transport services and parking, and where possible, be co-located with other administrative or services functions.
  6. All new development must incorporate ‘equity of access’ as a fundamental planning and design objective. This will include pathways designed to Australian Standards for disability access, and building entries facing major walkways.
  7. Artwork associated with new buildings or individual placements is to be encouraged in the public realm.

Sustainability

  1. New buildings and other works on the University campus must incorporate measures to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, reduce total water use, and encourage use of sustainable transport. Measures may include solar and wind energy generation systems, grey and black water systems, cycling and pedestrian facilities and amenities.
  2. To assist in maintaining the landscape character of the campus, vegetation losses must be balanced with new assets such as protection zones and plantings.


4.18 CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct Code

4.18.1 Precinct location

The CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct is located at the foot of Black Mountain and is bound by Barry Drive to the north and north east, Clunies Ross Street to the east and south east, and Black Mountain to the west and south west.

Figure 139 illustrates the location of the CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct.

Figure 139 - CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct locationFigure 139: CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct location

4.18.1 Land use for the CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct

Figure 140 - Land use for the CSIRO (Black Mountain) PrecinctFigure 140: Land use for the CSIRO (Black Mountain) Precinct

4.18.3 Detailed conditions of planning, design and development

This precinct is subject to the provisions of the Design and Siting General Code.